Does this price seem high

Page 2 of 2  

On Wed, 2 Sep 2009 11:12:51 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

The issue is that at the time replacing it was going to cost $274 in just labor. I can buy the motor for not much more then $100 and replace it myself. That leaves me $174 in my pocket for a couple hours work. If I take off the $74 service charge I'm still $100 ahead of where I'd be with the "free" motor.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Won't the manufacturer give you a new motor in place of the old one?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

How would I arrange that with "Goodman" since I'm not a "dealer" or whatever? I think theoretically it should be possible.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Call the dealer, He may do the swap for you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I can see you have no business education, and have never owned your own business.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well professor?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, what?
I was stating the obvious. The man was complaining about how much it cost to have is AC fixed, thinking that it was a job that a technician could come to his house, go to the truck and get a part, and fix it on the spot. That's not counting all the run around time to go get the part, driving to and fro, liability insurance, vehicle insurance, fuel, mandatory worker's comp insurance, unemployment insurance, FICA, overhead, licenses, training courses, tools, consumables, advertising, renting a shop, employees, uniforms, printing, ......... it goes on and on and on.
It's all covered in Business 101, or the first year a person goes into business for themselves.
Hope that clears things up for you, but I doubt it.
If the OP is so smart, why didn't he fix it himself in the first place? And now that he is doing a DIY fix, how sure is he of the results, or is he going to have to call a REAL HVAC person out to fix his screwup and in the end cost triple or more than the original cost?
Cordially yours,
The Professor
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SteveB wrote:

Exactly, and it is the #1 reason business startups fail. People have the attitude that even when something is reasonable they are being "ripped off" and it could be done for half or less because they just don't want to understand the costs involved.

You are probably right. Some people just have an intense hate of any business.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We go through his from time to time. First of all, it is not a one hour job if that is what he spends at the house. He has to order the motor and have it delivered, or go pick it up. He has to pay for the truck, the liability insurance, the ladder to get on the roof, the paperwork for billing, the telephone, health insurance, office and shop rent, etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Also it seems reasonable to expect the owner to do (or pay for) some annual maintenance on any motor that's mounted in a fairly exposed location and only used for part of the year! We have two conditions here, where motors need fairly regular attention. 1) Motors that get a lot of use; this includes our bathroom fan. Which we have rebuilt it a couple of times during the last almost 40 years, and every couple years (approx) it needs lubrication and cleaning of the fan blades. 2) Motors that get very little (or occasional) use like on our camper and/or the boat. They tend to stick and gum up due to low use and or exposure of lube to weather. We do all our own maintenance except refrigeration; but certainly understand maintenance people. It is essential for them to avoid call backs for reasons of cost and customer satisfaction; so it is natural for them to specify new parts so they can't be faulted for not doing a proper job. Also trying to fix previously unseen parts, on site, can be very time consuming. And they may have to turn around and order new parts anyway. Owners who are going to be concerned about costs should probably do their own maintenance, at least for a while, in order to learn the ins and outs of their equipment. As a do it yourself-er it is my choice to find out (run the risk) that one has to go at something again ................. "Darn it; should have replaced that xyz gizmo while I was at at it, hope it doesn't rain Saturday, to have another go at it etc.". Also occasionally there are parts/equipment that are not up to the job. We once had a 1976 Chev Bel-Aire with a bad starter, after three attempts by a supposedly competent alternator/starter exchange took it off myself, took it apart and found the problem that was causing the pinion gear to not slide into position. Time used; high. Material used; minimal. A full service garage wouldn't have messed with it, as I did. They would have put on another complete rebuilt starter and hopefully never seen me again.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Problem solved...if we converted to Obamacare for *everything* it would be free...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I can see you're not a teacher.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Why the hostility? I've been in the rental housing business for over 30 years and this was the highest estimate I've ever had for replacing a condenser motor and in the earlier jobs the lessor prices included the motor, in this job the motor was under warranty. He told me what was wrong, what he had checked, and that if I wanted I could have the motor replaced and the labor would be the $274. I know how long it should take to replace a motor on one of these, I've done several myself when I had the time, it's about half an hours work. So it seems a little high to me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My SIL's forced air unit fan motor failed..... forced air unit does the air circulating for heat & A/C.
The AC people wanted $650 to remove & replace the motor. Seemed maybe a bit high but what if the guy has a hard time getting the squireel cage off the shaft & has to take it back to the shop? A Lennox motor was probably $200 so maybe the price was a hundred or so high.
These bids are fixed price not T&M....they have to cover the "problem job"
If one doesn't like the price, one can shop it or DIY.
Travel & the work cannot be done in an hour....more like three hours
cheers Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Try replacing the capacitor. That might save you buying another motor. The prices sound reasonable, that is, if they diagnose correctly and fix the problem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They also have hard start kits available for the COMPRESSOR motor. However from several other bits of info provided:
It started with a nudge. How can u nudge a compressor motor?
He said he could get a new motor for $111. You can't buy a compressor for that amount
He said he could easily put it in himself, which is also something not possible with a compressor.
So, it sounds like he's talking about the fan motor. Not sure about this, but think the FAN motors do not have a start capacitor?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sep 2, 2:49pm, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

My older AC has oil ports on the outside fan motor, I wonder if he ever checked his motors.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It is VERY rare for an OEM condenser fan motor to fail in two years, though certainly not impossible. It is also about as rare to have a capacitor last for two years in the South, with the 60+ days in a row of triple digit temps, as we have had. As to the price, we would charge close to that amount to replace a warranty fan motor. A few bucks less than $275, but fairly close. Good luck Larry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.