Do you like CPVC as much as copper?

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Thanks Mike - I never used copper-bond. You like it huh? Tell me why. Harry
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Hi Stretch -
Thanks for the great explanation. You gave me a lot of information for my 100 feet run to the kitchen sink. Can I buy CPVC in 100 foot coils? Harry
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CPVC is way too stiff to coil. Straight lengths (and fittings) only.
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And who would really pay for that tool? Nothing is truly free.
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Longer explanation earlier on earlier thread. It's a two-part epoxy product that eliminates the soldering process. And I've used a torch for 30 years, damned good at it, but that stuff is easier, quicker, no leaks, no fires, no big deal. I do, however, use Q-tip sticks without the cotton, instead of the squarish sticks they used to pvovide. After I told them how the Q-tip sticks were better, they stopped providing anything to mix or apply with, which I see as an improvement.
wrote:

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It probably is. I just bought a crimping tool for cable and paid $35 for it because I wanted a quality tool, not the $9 cheapo. I don't know what makes the PEX tool so expensive.

How does that reduce the price of material for those that don't lose tools? Or for the consumer?

The pro knows the value of PEX and will buy the tool he needs. Right now they are seeming avoiding the DIY market but cheaper tools will come along. The pro gets a lot of use from his tool if he uses PEX on a regular basis. Yes, the DIY market is being shunned a bit it seems. The pro will buy 500 feet of tubing, chance are the DIY guy will not so they still don't get the free tool. OTOH, if you are building a $300,000 house, the cost of the too versus time save becomes a non-issue.
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My local builder supply rents the crimping tool for $10/day. The little rings and the fittings as usual cost more than the tubing. I buy a few extras and return the leftovers with the tool. Take care to hold the tool straight when crimping. The tubing is white and flexible. A few years back, I installed the grey plastic tubing in the wall for a future bathroom. Before I got to that stage (long term building projects are my forte),the grey plastic was outlawed for being prone to leaks. That system used plastic compression fittings, no longer available. I fished the new tubing in by clamping it to the grey stuff, crimped on the fittings and was all done in about 20 minutes. I also have the hard white CPVC in my house, and have had one joint blow apart, luckly it was in the crawl space. This was years after installation and that's kind of scary. The crimped-on ring is definitely an improvement over glued joints.
JohnK
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John,

CPVC is usually more cream colored than white PVC. In any case, my guess is that joint was not glued together, or wasn't cleaned properly (primed) before gluing.
I had one joint in my own installation that blew apart like that. I turned on the water, everything was quiet for a while, then a pop and the sound of rushing water in the crawlspace. When I climbed under I discovered the one joint I forgot to glue up. Ooops... :) The glue and primer are colored, so I went back over the entire installation and verified I hadn't missed any other spots!
Once a joint has been solvent welded, I've never seen any way to get them apart. They basically melt into one solid piece.
Anthony
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You can usually rent the tool. From your description, you'd only have to do a couple of crimps, so you could probably get by with whatever the minimum rental fee would be.
PEX doesn't require as many joins for long runs as CPVC. It's also more forgiving than CPVC if you get a frozen pipe. Even Florida gets the occasional Arctic Clipper -- if you're going into the attic, having a pipe that will "flex" with the freeze instead of taking our your ceiling drywall when it splits is a nice plus.
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If your sole purpose is to get hot water to the kitchen sink, you can save yourself alot of bother;
Put a 4(?) gallon water heater under your sink. They're little larger than a Coleman picnic jug, plug into a wall socket, and flex-connect between the hot water supply and the faucet.
I've seen them on the net for about $130
It's rare that you will use that much hot water at the sink. and if you need more, by then, the hot water will have arrived from the main water heater.

<rj>
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