Do they have to touch and would too much oil interfere in their touching?

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My car's radio antenna doesn't fully retract when the radio is off and it's really cold out. I know it needs to have the mast lubricated, but the only "oil" I can find now is Sta-bil, the gasoline stabilizer. Do you think that would work?
More important and with deeper electonic meaning, is it possible that actual oil say, or any other lubricant, getting between two of the telescoping sections of the car antenna could impede the electrical current which is the radio signal? Even if oil conducts electricity (does it?) the conductivity is less than the metal in the antenna, so wouldn't there be a partial reflection at the junction between metal and oil and again between oil and metal, and twice again between the next larger concentric piece of tubing that is the antenna? About 10 junctions in all, I think, for my 6-section antenna.
Or do the pieces of antenna even have to touch each other for them to act as one antenna? I know there are signal reflectors that don't have to touch the antenna, say for an indoor radio, plus my hand sometimes affects reception, but reflection is different from reception.
Do they have to touch and would too much oil interfere in their touching?
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wrote:

I am shocked that a renown home repairer like you does not have some oil laying around but you can usually get enough from the dip stick in the engine to lube that antenna.
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On 1/27/2016 2:25 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Probably yes, the antenna sectons need to touch. A bit of oil won't make any difference.
I'd hesitate to use the drop of oil off the dipstick, the detergent oils absorb moisture from the air. I'd rather use the transmission dipstick. Or go buy some oil.
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A dry lubricant such as white lithium grease or graphite would be best.
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On 1/27/2016 4:15 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

I wonder what the manufacturer says?
White lith... not what I'd call dry.
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Once the carrier (solvent) evaporates, it is.
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On Wed, 27 Jan 2016 14:25:43 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Get the antenna up. Then cut the wire to the motor that makes it go up. I never understood why antennas need to retract anyhow. (Unless you live in a ghetto where they are broken off to be used as weapons).
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On Wednesday, January 27, 2016 at 2:25:55 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Or use some cooking oil, PAM spray, etc.
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On 1/27/2016 4:09 PM, trader_4 wrote:

The one time I knew someone who used cooking spray (in a keyhole of a door knob lock) it turned rancid and adhesive. I got to dissemble it and charge them for cleaning and relube.
I'd not want to use that on car antenna.
Makes me wonder if the sticky part of the mechanism is way down inside, and treating the telescoping is only a symptom.
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On 01/27/2016 01:18 PM, Micky wrote:

A little 3 n 1 oil should do the trick.
I can't recall what I paid for it but the cost / year has just been a few pennies
I also keep automotive engine oil in a small squirt bottle which is fine for most things around the house
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Sounds like you already have too much oil and the cold oil is causing problems. You might try some of the silicon luberciation.
Yes, the antenna sections do need to touch. If just a light coating of oil is used the sections should penetrate the oil coating and make contact. I doubt you could really put too much oil on them to prevent electrical contact, but too much oil might cause mechanical problems of it going up and down. You did not try to use some grease on them did you?
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It may be better if the sections touch, but if the radio wave made it miles through the air I think it could handle another millimeter.
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While you would think so, they do not work that way. You can try the same effect if you slightly pull the antenna away from a TV set while receiving an on the air station.
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That is not the same thing. The extendable car antennas as sleeves, with much more coupling.
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For optimal operation, the antenna should be 1/4 the wavelength of the signal being received. So, for an 88mhz FM signal, the optimal antenna would be 0.25(3.4), or 0.85 meters.
Varying from that will reduce the effectiveness of the antenna.
AM signals are received by a loop antenna, not the whip antenna.
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What loop antenna on a car ? The only ones I know of was some when the cars had running boards and the antenna looped under one of them.
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On Wed, 27 Jan 2016 18:14:57 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

That is just wrong. I am old enough to remember when cars only had AM radio and we still used the same whip antenna.
For Micky, I doubt cleaning or oiling is going to fix this unless it is really gummed up. My guess is there is a kink in one of the elements or there is a problem in the retractor.
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On 1/27/2016 6:19 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I remember my parents 1970 Chevrolet Nova. The AM antenna was in the windshield, sort of T shaped loop. No whip antenna to be had.
Worth a try with the oil. Though, the problem may be motor or other mechanism.
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Many cars had the antenna in the glass. It was for the AM and FM if the car had both in it. I am not sure where it is in my Camry. Doesn't appear to show up in the windshield.
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On Wed, 27 Jan 2016 19:13:42 -0500, Stormin Mormon

That is in response to people breaking off the regular whips and all the problems they had with the early retractables
I am old enough to remember car radios with tubes in them. (vibrator power supply). In those days a radio would kill a battery pretty fast because they pulled about 15a. We didn't start seeing transistor radios in cars until the 60s. That was "daddy's car", our cars look like something you see in Havana today. ;-)
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