DIY carpet installation

I plan on replacing basement carpet which smells like dog piss from the previous owners. The crap is glued down hence removing it will be a job...
I'd like to install the carpet myself for 2 reasons: a) clearing out the basement would suck...since the basement is 25x25, I can do it in 12 or 15 foot sections depending on which width I buy, b) I'm on a budget
I know I won't do a great job...I've never done anything like this before. But frankly even a shoddy job, that looks half-way decent, will likely be better than dog-piss-carpet
I also don't want to use the integral-pad carpet that is glued down. By the looks of it, the pad doesn't seem to be as breathable. Therefore I plan on nailing tack-boards into the concrete.
My questions:
1) Is this out of my league? The floor supports might be tricky...
2) Whats the deal with carpet stretching? Is this a tool I rent?
3) Any resources or tips?
Thanks, Mike
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Only if you have less than one arm.

Simple solution. Buy carpet that does require either stretching or tack boards. It's cheaper as well. Roll it out and use double sided tape to fasten to the floor..

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That sort of carpet is usually the type with an integrated rubberized pad.
That's the type that will get smelly if there's the slightest bit of moisture.
It'll unstick too.
Tack strips with concrete nails are quite easy to use. Kickers are easy too.
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Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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Chris Lewis wrote:

Chris,
I think you hit it right on the head with the integrated rubberized pad. The stuff does have a bit of mustiness along with the dog piss.
If you were to guess on which pad would be most resilient to moisture/odor, what would it be?
Thanks, Mike
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Before you get too worried about that, check the slab for dampness.
Take a 18" square chunk of heavy plastic sheeting (clear if possible) and tape down all four sides onto the bare concrete.
Leave it for a week or two.
If you have no condensation under the plastic, then it doesn't make a whole heck of a lot of difference what pad you install.
If you do have condensation, I'd recommend talking to a professional for guidance on what to do. If the condensation is bad enough, no amount of porosity on the carpet/pad is going to help.
Or go with a subfloor.
We passed the condensation test, so we didn't have any trouble.
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the
Use an ice scraper or chopper on a long handle to scrape it up.

Yes
Most carpet should not be laid over concrete below grade. Check this out before you end up with a mildew mold carpet and pad.
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Its definitely a concern of mine,
Apparently, here in Wisconsin, this is what people do. Nobody I know, with non-smelly carpet in their basements, has a subfloor.
I've thought about using dricore or other similar products (plywood with dimpled plastic feet), but the stuff is expensive and reduces my headroom by an inch or two.
Apparently Berber carpet is supposed to breath.
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Depends on what the binding is. If it's a porous woven substrate, it'll "breath". Rubberized? No. Carpet pad usually doesn't breath very well.
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Why don't you just paint the concrete floor, and then put down a pair of rugs?
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Carpet squares are cool. Easy to put down. Especially on concrete. And if a pet piddles on one take it up and replace it in 2 minutes. pretty cheap as well.
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A suggestion to rid the floor of the smell after removing the curerent carpet. Clean with a cheap household bleach and after rinsing, wash again with white vinegar . The smell will be gone. I did this in the interior of my house in Dec. It worked great.
amby
snipped-for-privacy@home.now wrote:

this
decent,
glued
a
minutes.
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The dye might be gone too. Go careful on the bleach! Test on a scrap or hidden piece first. Dilute the bleach.
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It shouldnt' be beyond your ability to do this job. I would recommend a glue-down installation of broadloom, or a glue or tape down installation of carpet tile.
As others have pointed out, installing carpet over a below grade (i.e. damp) slab ain't a good idea.
KB

job...
the
on
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