Disposing of Bleach Water

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http://www.healthyhomecare.com/faq_bleach.shtml#5 . this tells all about bleach and how it breaks down rapidly
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For goodness sake! Why the hell are you bleaching your bird feeders? You garden organically, but happily slop bleach around your yard? Use soap. Better yet, just water. Or even better, just leave the silly thing alone. The birds don't care, and neither should you!
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You garden organically, but happily slop bleach around your yard? Use soap. Better yet, just water. Or even better, just leave the silly thing alone. The birds don't care, and neither should you!<
Like humans, birds transmit diseases to each other. Unlike humans, they also poop where they eat, exacerbating the problem. Diseases like Conjunctivitis are easily transmitted through contaminated feeders. Here's a quote from the Wild Birds Unlimited website:
4. Keep feeders clean - Clean and disinfect feeders regularly. Use one part liquid chlorine household bleach in nine parts of tepid water (a 10% solution) to disinfect. Make enough solution to immerse an empty, cleaned feeder completely for two to three minutes. Allow to air dry. Once or twice a month should do, but weekly cleaning may be needed if you notice sick birds at your feeders. But thanks for your concern.
-Fleemo
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This is also true for kittens. I saw it on the Wild Kittens Unlimited website.
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

There are better disinfectants than bleach. Quaternary ammonia is a great hospital disinfectant and will kill germs, viruses, and parasites. A 0.1% solution would probably be about right for this use. I buy it at Fleet Farm as a 10% concentrate called "Steramine" in the dairy supplies aisle. You would use about 1 1/2 ounces (3 Tbsp.) per gallon of water.
Best regards, Bob
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And just how many municipal water systems are dumping ammonia in the water supply to purify it? How many pool supply retail outlets are pushing ammonia? Sorry - bleach is the extremely economical and effective disinfectant.
snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

There are better disinfectants than bleach. Quaternary ammonia is a great hospital disinfectant and will kill germs, viruses, and parasites. A 0.1% solution would probably be about right for this use. I buy it at Fleet Farm as a 10% concentrate called "Steramine" in the dairy supplies aisle. You would use about 1 1/2 ounces (3 Tbsp.) per gallon of water.
Best regards, Bob
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http://www.cqs.com/edioxin.htm "We now know that dioxin exhibits serious health effects when it reaches as little as a few parts per trillion in your body fat. Dioxin is a powerful hormone disrupting chemical. By binding to a cell's hormone receptor, it literally modifies the functioning and genetic mechanism of the cell, causing a wide range of effects, from cancer to reduced immunity to nervous system disorders to miscarriages and birth deformity. Because it literally changes the functioning of your cells, the effects can be very obvious or very subtle. Because it changes gene functions, it can cause so-called genetic diseases to appear, and can interfere with child development. There is no "threshold" dose - the tiniest amount can cause damage, and our bodies have no defense against it... Unfortunately, according to the EPA, much of the population of the U.S. is at the dose at which there can be serious health effects...
Dioxin...has been a hazard downstream of paper mills (where chlorine bleach combines with natural organics in wood pulp and produces dioxin)."
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http://www.cleaningpro.com/toxic.cfm
"Nationwide, more than 32 million pounds of household cleaning products are poured down the drain each day. Many of these products contain toxic substances that are NOT processed adequately by sewage treatment plants or septic systems. Careless or improper use and disposal of these products may threaten individual health or lead to accidental poisoning. Long term or cumulative environmental consequences may also occur like contamination of surface and ground water...
DID YOU KNOW ? a.. THAT OF THE 17,OOO CHEMICALS THAT APPEAR IN COMMON HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTS, ONLY 30% HAVE BEEN ADEQUATELY TESTED FOR THE NEGATIVE EFFECTS ON OUR HEALTH ...
a.. MEDICAL DOCTORS AND SCIENTISTS HAVE STUDIED, ANALYZED, EVALUATED, AND CONCLUDED THAT THERE IS A DEFINITIVE CONNECTION BETWEEN OUR HEALTH AND THE USE OF EVERYDAY COMMON HOUSEHOLD CLEANING CHEMICALS ...
Most household cleaners contain toxic chemicals. Ammonia is in almost all of them and is lethal if combined with bleach (forming chloramine)...
As a by-product of its oxidizing process, BLEACH releases 'chloramine gas' into the air which destroys oxygen content and diminishes indoor air quality dramatically...
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http://www.care2.com/channels/solutions/home/511?print=1 Chlorine bleach can cause cancer causing chemicals to form in the waste water stream.
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http://www.non-toxic.info /
The most toxic substances to aquatic organisms present in the water were household bleach, all-purpose cleaner, laundry detergent, and dish detergent.
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http://nemo.uconn.edu/publications/clean_waters/cwfact2.pdf
Chlorine bleach compounds are toxic to aquatic organisms in very low concentrations...
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effi blurted out in a politically correct tone: "Nationwide, more than 32 million pounds of household cleaning products are poured down the drain each day. Many of these products contain toxic substances that are NOT processed adequately by sewage treatment plants or septic systems.
===== Yeah - I'm certain that my local municipal sewage treatment plant is going to be bother by a bit of additional sodium hypochlorite in the waste water that I send to them. What the hell do you think is the major bacteria destroyer that they add to the water as they are treating it? I'd continue to explain to you, but I've got to go hug a tree right now.
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On 1/26/2005 6:00 PM US(ET), Gideon took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

I can see hugging another person, animal, or even a stuffed toy, but a tree? There are ants and bugs crawling all over it.
--
Bill

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Not if you spray the tree with bleach first.
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(snipped)

plonk!
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Pure natural spring water can be toxic if you drink too much of it. The bleach is no big deal if diluted or evaporated.
Chlorine in drinking water has saved millions form water borne disease.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
  Click to see the full signature.
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Effi can find information that proves everything is toxic.
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

You've got some weird answers and some fairly answers. First, it won't hurt the ecosystem. Second, 10 percent solution will kill many plants, so pour it where you want to kill plants. Don't want to kill any plants? Let it sit outside in bucket for a couple of days, dilute and pour in a hole (like in your garden). Soil microorganisms will break it down very quickly. On a sewer system? put it in the potty and flush. All the S#%* flowing in the system will rapidly inactivate it provide some benefit.
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This is Turtle.
Rinse the sinks and toilets with the water to disinfect them too while your at it. It also help kill germs and oders from the drains. Bleach Kill All germs including Aids. Also use it on dirty places on your concrete drive ways or patios. Also put it in the Trash cans to disinfect them too but do wash it out if they are metal.
Also use it to kill foot oder from your feet. there was a Foot Doctor that told my uncle that soaking his feet in a 1 part bleach and 3 part water would remove all the dead skin from his feet and stop the foot oder from his feet for 3 to 6 months. Also don't soak your feet more than 5 minute in the bleach solution or it will wrinkle up your skin on your feet.
Next week we will cover using it to clean the white wall on your tires of your car. Tune in next week !
TURTLE
P.S. the cleaning your feet of Foot Oder with bleach is not a Joke and was really told to my uncle by a Dermitologiest.
TURTLE
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On 24 Jan 2005 10:23:02 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

Pour it on the street. It will quickly dissipate.
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Nonsense. End products of bleach oxidation are small amounts of water- soluble things like sodium chloride. Harmless if well-dispersed.
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

Created an ecosystem with bleach water? How about building a rocket and flying the bucket to Mars? Get rid of the bird feeder and weed seed, buy a shrub with some nice berries and let the critters eat what nature provides. You might get "double duty" from a shrub with flowers that attract butterflies.
You are "sterilizing" stuff the animals poop on? Save "sterile" for the kitchen and bath. Better yet, clean is fine. Your animal friends eat dead, rotting animal and vegetable matter, so they don't need indoor sanitation in the outdoors.
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Norminn wrote:

Normin, you need to know what your are talking about before opening your mouth. Bird feeders create non-natural conditions of extreme crowding which results in the spread disease. Nearly every birder knows that that they need to sterilize feeders and birdbaths to reduce the spread of disease. BTW, nearly every newspaper and television stations has annual articles about this.
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The poster asked for your advice on how to best dispose of bleach. Why the sermon on lifestyle and tree-hugging?
Your not too big on hygiene, are you? I assume that one bar of soap and one roll of toilet paper probably last you about 25 years.
==================== Norminn wrote Created an ecosystem with bleach water? How about building a rocket and flying the bucket to Mars? Get rid of the bird feeder and weed seed, buy a shrub with some nice berries and let the critters eat what nature provides. You might get "double duty" from a shrub with flowers that attract butterflies.
You are "sterilizing" stuff the animals poop on? Save "sterile" for the kitchen and bath. Better yet, clean is fine. Your animal friends eat dead, rotting animal and vegetable matter, so they don't need indoor sanitation in the outdoors.
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