Dishwasher separate circuit????


I picked up this question on another news group. =====================================

Then I wrote:
Anyone got a reference to the appropriate section of the Electrical Code (or whatever)?
Our first and second dishwashers have, for the last 40 years or so, been plugged into an under counter-top outlet which as far as one knows is tapped into a regular run of counter outlets fed with #12AWG and a 20 amp breaker!**
Since am planning to do some work from the sub-panel into the closet area behind the dishwasher etc., shortly, would be useful to know and add a dedicated circuit if necessary!
Comments/advice welcomed.
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seperate 20 amp circuit.
new dishwashers have high wattage heaters and can trip 15 amp breakers......
besides if your working on a hard wired dishwasher its best if powering it off doesnt kill other things
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There is no such thing as too many circuits!
You might as well run one, since you will be "there". And bring 220 over (3 wire bx/romex), in case you get a 220 unit, ditto for the garbage disposal. 220 V hookups are always better, balance the load better to the main service, easier on the wires.
Having said that, you could have 20 major appliances, toasters, microwaves on one circuit, and be ok.... as long as you just use one at a time! And, a high current appliance, and say a a lite/electric can opener etc. on one circuit is no big deal either. Altho, from a purist pov, it is nice to have heavy-draw appliances on dedicated circuits.
So apparently, your current set up is fine, for your use pattern. But wiring for the future is never a bad idea, costs/time permitting.
--
EA



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Under certain circumstances, you can feed both a dishwasher and a disposal with a single circuit, but certain criteria must be met. Personally, I would just run dedicated circuits for each. You'll find the details in Nec 430.33
Another note: It used to be acceptable to hard wire a dishwasher as the "unit switch" would serve as the required disconnect. Pretty much all newer dishwashers have electronic switching and no longer use "unit switches" , so a disconnecting means must be provided.
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