dishwasher air gap


I have a thick cast iron sink and do not want to drill a new hole, but I need to do something with my dishwasher "air gap" ( I am using the fourth hole for my water purifier) I am thinking of removing the air gap and draining the dishwasher straight into the garbage disposal. Is this a good or bad idea. I presently have the air gap tide up as high as I can under the sink, but on occasion it does leak.
Dennis
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Yes, drain direct to disposal, but make the loop of hose go up as high as possible under the counter. Clamp hose in place.
Jim
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only community that I've known to require air gap devices was Tempe, AZ. Just be sure to loop the dishwasher drain hose up as high as possible under the sink cabinet before coming down and connecting to the disposal. You don't want the loop to be lower than the highest possible water level in the sink to prevent sink water running into the dishwasher in addition to down the drain.
Tom G
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I believe there are accessory faucets available with an integrated dishwasher air gap, e.g. <http://www.waterinc.com/water_gap.htm .
Cheers, Wayne
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Several things to consider:
1. Check if the air gap is required by code in your city. They are in CA, for example. Not in many other states.
2. Even if required by code, there may be exceptions for dishwashers built with a suitable backflow prevention device. It may be a pain getting an inspector to sign off however.
3. If the sink/dishwasher are installed on an outside wall, there are some through-the-wall air gaps available, sometimes called a "Johnson Tee". It's a neat solution although finding parts and installing them may prove a pain. I might have gone this route but for the fact my sink backs onto an inside wall.
4. An improperly installed air gap (like your current setup) is probably worse than no air gap at all, especially if your dishwasher has a backflow device. If the air gap is leaking, cleaning it may help -- they tend to leak when partially blocked.
5. Otherwise, just loop the hose as high as you possibly can under the cabinet and dispose of the air gap entirely. Again, that's safer if your dishwasher has the backflow prevention.
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In two different houses, four different machines over the past 35+ years and it was always direct into the disposal. Has never been a problem.
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Yeah, but folks violate electrical, plumbing and other codes every day without a problem. Until there's a problem...
If the OP lives in CA (and some other places) there almost certainly will be a problem when he comes to sell the property. Almost any home inspector will catch that one with a cursory glance at the sink.
Having said all that... I'd probably take the risk if it wasn't a local code requirement here.
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