Dish washer and garbage disposal

Page 2 of 3  
On 11/18/2014 05:56 AM, John G wrote:

Well, one problem solved.
Went to two suppliers and could not find an Eaton/Cutler Hammer GFCI breaker so will use the GFCI outlet method.
Will be better when the need arises for removing the washer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Here in NYC they have to be on dedicated circuits.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Two separate circuits seems unreasonable, since you rarely would be startin g to use the disposal at the exact same time as the dishwasher motor is sta rting up. The outlet route with a short cord and plug is definitely the wa y togo for ease of current use and future repairs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 17 Nov 2014 21:34:08 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net"
The only problem is to have 2 pieces of equipment on one circuit is the name plate load will have to be less than 20a when you use 125% of the largest one plus the smaller at 100% You might just make it tho.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 18 Nov 2014 01:02:51 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

As a practical matter, I've had both on the same circuit for 30 years and never had a problem. Rare they both run together, but once in a while they do for a brief time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/18/2014 05:00 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

The dish washer is a pretty small one and I did not see the name plate when I was there, but it has #16 wire so I doubt a 20 amp circuit would be over-loaded even if they did run the disposal briefly
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That GFCI on the dish washer is a new requirement in the 2014 code. I would be surprised if Florida adopted it by 2017. I don't even have a 14 code book we are just getting ready for the 11.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/18/2014 12:04 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

yep, I went to Home Depot's website and that's the one I found... only the closest Home Depot to my house no longer carries any Cutler Hammer products.
Considering the price, it was cheaper to just get a standard breaker (elsewhere) and a GFCI outlet.
Plus as was mentioned...the dishwasher can just be unplugged if it needs to be pulled out and worked on.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes:

I am curious where the GFCI outlet for the dishwasher will be located -- maybe in a cabinet space next to the dishwasher? -- similar to how an over-the-range microwave outlet is often located in a cabinet space above the microwave? I am assuming that the dishwasher GFCI outlet would need to be located someplace where it could be reset if it trips without having to pull the dishwasher out first to reset the GFCI.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/18/2014 08:33 PM, TomR wrote:
<snip>

I am going to put the outlet in the cabinet under the sink. It will be easy to access in the event it trips. The home owner will of course be informed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Got it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 18 Nov 2014 12:24:05 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in
Just curious: so dishwashers have been installed without GFCI for 60 or so years. Now they need to have GFCI. What has changed to require the code intrusion? Are a lot of people suddenly getting electrocuted or have a lot of people always been getting electrocuted and the code writers just deciding to do something about it?
Or were the code writers just bored this year?
--
I kill-file all messages posted through Google Groups.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/18/2014 5:32 PM, VinnyB wrote:

I suspect the code writers got paid off by the GFCI lobbyists, who took them to Vegas for all drinks paid weekend at the Mustang Ranch.
Cynical, much?
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/18/2014 04:32 PM, VinnyB wrote:

It's just a matter of safety. GFCI
Back 60 years ago houses did not even have grounded outlets much less GFCI ( Invention date 1961 according to a Google search)
I just recalled that my grandparents' house was built in 1948 and had a dishwasher. As I kid I really thought that was hi tech. Even though my grandmother had a dish washer I still recall that her toaster was one of those old-fashioned kind that toasted one side of the bread at a time
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

*The explanation given in my code class (If I remember correctly) was that the controls for dishwashers are becoming more and more electronic and less and less mechanical. The electronic components insulating ability breaks down over time and current can leak to the metal frame thereby creating a s hock hazard.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, November 18, 2014 7:13:01 PM UTC-5, John G wrote:

t the controls for dishwashers are becoming more and more electronic and le ss and less mechanical. The electronic components insulating ability break s down over time and current can leak to the metal frame thereby creating a shock hazard.
It's not much of a shock hazard if the metal frame is grounded, which has b een a code requirement for a very long time. The poster raises a good question . It would be interesting to see if they have any real world data that justif ies making this GFCI or if they have no data to back it up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/19/2014 6:59 AM, trader_4 wrote:

Seems to me it can possibly prevent a shock hazard under certain circumstances. When the kids were little, indtead of giving them a bath we'd just put them in the dishwasher on the "gentle" cycle. I always worried they could get a shock if the heating element shorted out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/18/2014 4:32 PM, VinnyB wrote:

I'm sure that nothing like this EVER happens, but perhaps the lobbyists for NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association) took some folks out to dinner or on a fishing trip.
Either that or somebody's second cousin on their mother's side got drunk, went to fix his dishwasher, opened up the electrical connection box and, deciding to off load some of the beer, took a whiz and...
Remember, although a code change can literally cost consumers millions of dollars, if it save the life of just one Darwin cheating idiot and allows him to recreate and expand the pool of morons, it's all worth it.<g>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 17 Nov 2014 21:34:08 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net"
I don't know why that would be -- I'm often cleaning the dishes, loading up the dishwasher, and as I finish loading, put the soap in, and start the dishwasher, I either continue washing pots and pans, or realize I didn't run the disposal and need to before the dishwasher starts draining, so I run it then, right as the dishwasher is cycling. I can't be the only one.
Having said that, our current 1955 house has the dishwasher, disposal, all of the counter outlets and many of the lights on the same circuit. But that doesn't mean it's a good idea.
Josh
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.