DISCOLORED WATER FROM NEW GAS HOT WATER HEATER

I had a gas State Select 80 gallon hot water heater installed five months ago. From day one my hot water will be discolored (looks like air in water) for the first 20 seconds after it is turned on. If I drain the water from the tank pressure relief valve I get the same result. The tank also rumbles when heating, sounds as if the water is boiling, but it is not. The dealer has drained the tank at least three times, trimed some type of rod inside the tank and added a accumulator tank to the top of the unit. So far the manufacturer has refused to replace the tank. If I leave the discolored water in a glass it will clear up in about ten minutes. I have had four electric hot water heaters in the house since 1971, never a discoloration problem. I am on city water and the cold water is perfect. Any suggestions as to what my problem might be other than the Maufacturator not stading bedind his product.
thanks Brock
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@ADELPHIA.NET wrote:

It seems not too unusual to me. The air dissolved in the water is coming out. There is nothing that is going to be hurt by this. Weather conditions and a number of factors can cause it. Of course there are other possibilities, but that is my guess. I would expect it may decrease with use.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
call your water company, they will likely send out a service guy.
something like thisa happened when I was a child, the water company found the problem.......
its worth a call
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

because the problem did not exist with the old electric hot water heater. The very first time we heated the water in the new gas water heater I had the discoloratiom problem The unit has been in use now for five months and no improvement. Again, the cold water looks perfect.
thanks Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Then put the electric heater back in.
Are you sure that the new heater is set for the same temp as the old one?
The bubbles are simply air trapped in the water.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joseph Meehan wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 21 Sep 2006 11:04:42 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@ADELPHIA.NET wrote:

There is nothing wrong.
Simply the laws of physics at work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
in buffalo ny, city water from lake erie: our 75 gallon gas water heater aged 10 years and provided rusty water for 10 months until it failed by running hot water onto the basement floor which set off the $10 water alarm. we had a new tank and replacement gas and water valves standing by, installed it but had stupidity trouble lighting it until we bled the air out of the gas connector. works great with clean hot water. i just looked for your tiny bubbles, and they are there in cold and more visible in cooled off hot than hottest hot in a glass held up to the light. we run our new 50 gallon water heater at maximum temperature about 155 F for 4 adults, dishwasher, washing machine, and dog. inlet water varies with seasons from 75 to 35 degrees. suggest you compare yours to a neighbor's water as the amount of dissolved air and temps and water ingredients will vary. here's a favorite site with other assistance: http://www.waterheaterrescue.com/pages/WHRpages/English/site-map.html
snipped-for-privacy@ADELPHIA.NET wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@ADELPHIA.NET wrote:

A quick test on the elements might tell you if a element is bad. Turn the power off to the water heater, very important. Remove the covers to the elements .Next remove the wires on the elements (kind of a pain). If you have a ohms meter , great test the element . Take the ohms meter and test both of the element prongs . If you have continuity good . Next take one of the tester leads and put it on one side of the element and the other to the tank(rub it back and forth) rember continuty on this test is a bad elemet . Test both element.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
So, where would you connect the meter on a gas WH like the one the original poster bought?
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.