Digital TV

Page 2 of 4  

In wrote:

Unfortunately, DTV signals are line-of-sight so anything from a building near the Tx tower ten miles from you or the woods, trees, hills, general terrain, etc., can make a weak signal fluctuate. It's normal to lose reception during storms, snow, rain or even high humidity in some cases. The higher the channel frequency (not the channel number you receive on), the worse the symptoms will be. We're in a fringe area and have an 80 dBm amp running in order to get anything to come in and you should see how bad it gets here! Digital has a considerably shorter reception range than the old analog signals. Our gummint critters are work.
Twayne
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 01/14/10 10:37 am, news.eternal-september.org wrote:

Actually, No! We had flaky analog pictures on some channels but crystal-clear HD on the digital channels on the same TV with the same antennas (two antennas pointing in different directions to deal with the widely spread transmitters).
Perce
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/14/2010 11:55, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Pretty much the same here. And 3 of the stations actually now have substantially bigger footprints.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
news.eternal-september.org wrote:

Not always the case. My digital signals are much better than the analog ones used to be and I haven't lost any stations in the switchover. I can't pick up the San Bernardino PBS station digital signal (about 60 miles away), but then I never could get their analog signal either.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

North of Orlando,I get the Daytona PBS channel 15 when I could not under analog,but OTOH,I lost Ch.2 WESH-NBC. Good trade,IMO. ;-)
And under analog,my OTA channels were all snowy. Not under DTV.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

than analog signals were. The degree of loss from not being 'line of sight' depends solely upon the RF transmit frequency rather than if the modulation is analog or digital. DTV signals do suffer more from dynamic multipath reception however.
What is an 80 dBm amp? Is that the same as (80-30) dB?
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David wrote:

outdoor locations. I bought an amplifier because it would have been a good idea with UHF analog using that much cable. I never tried the amp because I discovered I could get all the channels indoors on the ground floor that I could get outdoors 30 feet above the ground. That convinced me that a few dB of gain wasn't important with HDTV.
One station 80 miles away would break up in some weather conditions. Reception improved if I turned the antenna 90 degrees from the transmitter. That must have reduced my gain by a lot of dB. I wouldn't have received anything at all with UHV analog, but digital worked.
I think multipath distortion from a reflection off the sky was causing the breakup. I don't know how turning the antenna helped. I was unaware of that kind of distortion with analog TV, perhaps because the ghost image was offset by only a millimeter or so.
I'm on a hill. My BIL is in a hole three miles from me. When we both had rooftop antennas, my reception was better than his. He couldn't get analog reception after he took his antenna down. He watched recorded movies.
I told him to try HDTV indoors. He had a cable and a 4-bay bowtie antenna. He paid $6 for the only balun available at Radio Shack. He couldn't get any channels, but when I unscrewed the balun and put my finger on the center conductor of the cable, he received some channels. Apparently that balun was causing reflections what would have been acceptable with analog TV.
I gave him a 25-cent balun and he was in business. He gets most of my channels and some I don't get, down in a hole with his antenna indoors, 80 miles from some of the transmitters. I doubt he has line-of-sight reception on any channel.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A good old style UHF corner reflector antenna s working great for me, I picked it up at rogers flea market for 10 bucks. come spring I will put it on the peak of roof with rotor. currently is ty wrapped to my chain link fence post.
weather was too cold for much else, on most channels its 90+ signal strength
sears sells this. its a digital video recorder. its time based recordings not name based like tivo but works well, and is high def.yu can start watching a show while its recording which you cant do with a vcr
http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_05757709000P?origin=prod&aff=Y&keyword=dtvpal&sid=I0084400010000100600
I am REALLY PISSED AT DISH NETWORK. I am a 13 year subscriber. they kept programing package prices the same, but hiked their fees dramatically if you have more than one receiver. 17 bucks a receiver plus other fees is insane
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
E Z Peaces wrote:

I've had the exact same experience here. My antenna is highly unidirectional. It should need a rotator to point it exactly to each transmitter for each different channel. But that just doesn't work here. I do recieve good signal over a wide area with the antenna aproximitly 90 degrees off. For one PBS station I need to rotate it but even that is iffy if it will work pointing to the tower or turn it 180 degrees and it picks up good signal from the rear of the antenna. I never know which is going to work best that day.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

can't do much about aircraft,but if strong storms or high winds are affecting your reception,perhaps your antenna is not aimed optimally,or it's mounting is not strong enough. One thing,though;10 miles may actually be -too close-,as you may be UNDER the station's antenna pattern. Thus the need for an outside rooftop antenna.
WRT the xmit power issue,many stations REDUCED xmitted power after a trial period. They wanted to save on their electric bill.
I also lost a low-VHF station(Ch.2) in the conversion. It's NBC,so no great loss.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I bought 5 or 6 antennas, tested them out, and returned the rest. The most expensive antenna was worse than average. Antenna selection/positioning will take some trial and error work, but once it's done, that's it! Comcast must hate me because I got many neighbors into using power antennas.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

maybe you should try that Make TV homemade antenna,it uses coathanger wire,a small board,some screws and washers,and a 75:300 ohm matching transformer.I get pretty good results with it,no amplifier needed.
It's a "quad bowtie" type of antenna.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
[snip]

And an amp won't fix poor reception anyway.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, but it will help in marginal signal situations.
Chip
--
-------------------- http://NewsReader.Com/ --------------------
Usenet Newsgroup Service $9.95/Month 30GB
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 14 Jan 2010 01:42:05 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cox.net wrote:

It "shouldn't" help then, but can somewhat because of the limited sensitivity of the receiver.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It can help if you're splitting the signal. Best place for an amp is up on the antenna mast before the signal is split.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 14 Jan 2010 18:27:46 -0600, AZ Nomad

Yes. You need to amplify the signal when it's good.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
[extraneous quotage deleted]

OTA isn't my primary reception method, but I'm about 40 miles from most San Francisco TV transmitters and I get nearly 50 stations (including subchannels) with an indoor bowtie. I'm in the flatlands, so my view of Sutro Tower is not blocked by hills.

You'll need to go to TVFool.com or AntennaWeb.org and put in your address to see what the likely results would be at your house. Because of frequency, power, and antenna height changes (and sometimes even antenna location changes), your experience could be better or worse with the digital versions of specific local stations.
Also, alt.video.digital-tv is a better place to get information. Watch out for the rabid pro- and anti-digital TV posters, but if you've been on Usenet for long, you already know to avoid the people with agendas.
Patty
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Metspitzer wrote:

I had poor reception with analog: severe ghosts on strong stations and severe snow on others. In preparation for going digital, I bought a so-called HDTV amplified set-top antenna. It made strong and weak stations much better.
That antenna was terrible when I got a digital TV. I got an old 4-bay outdoor antenna out of the closet and made a stand by sticking a pipe onto the pedestal of a broken office chair. I think I got 40 channels, all better than my best analog reception.
I took the antenna and TV outside, hoisted the antenna to a limb above rooftop level, and used a cord to aim it toward each station the FCC said was within 80 miles. I got the same 40 I got with the antenna beside the TV in my dining room. My most reliable reception comes from transmitters 80 miles away, while I can't receive from some transmitters 20 miles away.
It seems HDTV can work beautifully with weak signals because all that is necessary is to count pulses. Multipath distortion can break the train of pulses, causing trouble for HDTV. That's why I had trouble with the amplified set-top antenna. Multipath distortion can come from reflections in your house, outdoor obstacles like mountains, and even reflections off the sky in some conditions. An impedance mismatch between your antenna, cable, and TV can cause a similar problem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I live about 30-40 miles from my stations and am located on the backside of a hill between me and the stations. Analog signals were adequate but not good but the digital signals are very good. With analog I got 4 channels. With digital I get 14 channels. Note however that's channels and not stations since most stations are broadcasting 3 channels each. I only picked up 1 additional station when they went to digital, but at least I didn't lose any like many people did. KC
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.