debating how to install an outdoor outlet

I would like to install an outlet on the front of my house. I can do this a couple of ways. Since there is an outlet on the inside of the house opposite of where I want to place the outdoor one, I could simply drill a hole and tap into the one indoors. Problem is that my house is sided with asbestos shingles and I really don't think it's a good idea plus I am considering vinyl siding the house in the next few years. Option two is more complicated, but I think more feasible in the long term. My outdoor patio, which is screened in and attached to the house, has an outdoor plug. This plug is on the opposite side of the house. I'm thinking I could tap into it, run conduit around the foundation attached at various spots and then end with the plug where I want it. I would not have to go under doors and the benefit is that if I ever get siding, none of that would have to be removed because it's below the siding. I have one problem though and that is that I'm not sure how to tap into the patio outlet. It lies about 6 feet from the outside of the house within the screened in section of the patio. There's no way I could go horizontal within the wall because there's studs between where it lies and the outside. The goal would be to somehow get a wire branched off from that plug to the foundation-- from there I can run the conduit to where I want the outdoor plug.
The only other option I can think of, and I don't even know if it's possible, is following through with the first option except drilling the tap hole between the indoor plug, which lies a couple of feet above the foundation, between the indoor junction box and foundation with the hole exiting from the foundation. Being two feet higher would make the angle quite steep and I'm not even sure I have a good enough drill to go through that much foundation. The outlet though would still end up attached to the foundation and not the siding.
Any help or suggestions would be appreciated.
Thanks, Nonah
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On 12/05/2014 07:17 AM, Nonah wrote:

Do you have a crawl space? If so, get crawling.
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On 12/05/2014 07:30 AM, Jack Goff wrote:

Good point, but no crawl space.
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On 12/05/2014 06:17 AM, Nonah wrote:

No need to make things complicated, the above method will work fine. (I did the same thing to my house about 20 years ago.) If the shingles are simply those "tar-paper imitation brick" the asbestos is impregnated in the tar and any minute amount you'd dislodge would not be a health hazard. Having an outlet there would pose no problem to vinyl siding.
Of course you will have a GFCI outlet and a weather proof box.

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On Friday, December 5, 2014 7:52:01 AM UTC-5, philo  wrote:

+1
I wouldn't let irrational fear of asbestos shingles stop me from doing it the easy way. Asbestos is only dangerous if you don't handle it right. If you take the proper and simple precautions, no reason you can't drill a hole, install an outlet box. Nor would I worry about later installing vinyl siding. Installers have to deal with outlets all the time , it's no big deal. I'd definitely go that route, before running conduit/wiring all around the foundation. Another option if he's going to put up vinyl in a few years is to just wait.
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My first concern would be whether there was enough room in that box on the inside for another cable. If it is the last one on a run, it is probably OK. If there is a cable in and a cable out, the box is full.
If you are going through the wall. drill the hole just above the sole plate and fish the wire down to it. Leave some slack in the wall so you can clean this up when you install your new siding. (cut down and come out at the bottom) Whatever you do will be covered up with the new siding.
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On Friday, December 5, 2014 11:38:14 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

In that case he might be able to locate the outside outlet so that he could disconnect one of the cables that goes to the existing inside box, run it to the outside, then run from the outside box back to the inside box. That could work depending on how the cable runs, how long it is, and the possible locations for the new outside box.
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What about the attic? Where is the service panel? Do you have an open slot in the panel? The RIGHT way is a separate circuit for the outside outlet, run inside the building envelope if possible. I'd go across the attic and run a conduit down the outside wall - if and when you install vinyl siding, pop the conduit loose, install the siding, and refasten.
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referring to.. Still no problem - wear a dust mask and wet the siding if you are paranoid.
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I didn't read this whole thread, but can you run a wire through your attic and install the outlet in the soffit of the roof overhang?
Or, would that create a problem with the outlet not being easily accessible enough?
--
nestork


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On Fri, 05 Dec 2014 12:24:42 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Conduit is ugly. Even if it's the same color as the wall, it's ugly.
OP I put a floodlght in just by drilling through the wall behind where the switch was going to be, which was one foot above the receptacle I got the power from. Now I can lean out the window to change light bulbs and no conduit needed. Neighbor's hired electricians who ran ugly conduit from the porch light, and who sometimes disable the porch light in the process.
I'd go with option one. IIAC everyone with asbestosis spent years working with the stuff, or in factories that made the stuff,** Three minutes driling one hole is not going to make enough to hurt you and you could also tape a baggie over the spot where the drill is coming out. Or you could pour water over the wall and the floor so the dust will be caught by the water.
Even if you did breath some of the small amount of dust made, it would just clog a few alveolae out of the 700 million you have.
I am not a dare-devil. I wear a dust mask every time I go in the atic, to avoid breathing the fiberglass, even though after 25 years, I doubt there is any still floating around. You could also wear a dust mask while you drill the hole, even if it's not rated for asbestos. Maybe those are expensive but it's only 3 minutes, not 20+ hours every week
When you put on the siding, you and unscrew the box and place the siding.
**"[Asbestosis] usually occurs after high intensity and/or long-term exposure to asbestos (particularly in those individuals working on the production or end-use of products containing asbestos) and is therefore regarded as an occupational lung disease. People with extensive occupational exposure to the mining, manufacturing, handling, or removal of asbestos are at risk of developing asbestosis.[1] Sufferers may experience severe dyspnea (shortness of breath) and are at an increased risk for certain malignancies, including lung cancer but especially mesothelioma."
Be sure to use a GFI receptacle since the outlet will be outdoors, unless by chance the circuit is already protected by GFI.
BTW, it would have been easier to read your post if you'd left a blank line before each option,
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On 12/5/2014 17:14, micky wrote:

If feasible, you may want to put the GFI outlet inside the house and have it feed the outdoor outlet. Even with a weatherproof cover, GFI outlets have a higher failure rate when used outdoors than they do indoors.
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On 12/5/2014 8:14 PM, micky wrote:

Agree. This is the only sensible option.
Asbestos takes years to be a problem. This is not going to be harmful and while long term exposure to the dust is harmful, lawyers have blown it way out of proportion.
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On Fri, 5 Dec 2014 19:33:03 +0100, nestork

Good idea. Don't let my sarcasm make you think I don't mean that.

Then you could make it one of those dangling outlets.
They hang on the end of the cord, sometimes for two-wire receptacles with a built-in switch.
I have a two story house and 3 steps up to the front door. I'd need it to hang 10 feet. Maybe I could put a bird feeder on it.
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I've forgotten what was at the inside end of the hole. If a receptacle, he should make that one GFI. Unless it's the refrigerator.
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wrote:

receptacle. At least here in Waterloo Ontario a refrigerator requires it's own circuit. As an electrician my Dad always also put exterior receptacles on separate circuits (2 externals on one circuit on occaision, but externals not on circuits with internal outlets.
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On 12/05/2014 11:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Exactly! Your father is a smart man!
Less intelligent people don't realize the mayhem that can occur from placing an outdoor receptacle on an indoor circuit.
For example, suppose a guy is watching the game on his 60 inch 700 watt plasma tv and recording another game on his media center pc. His wife is out in the yard trimming the hedges and accidentally nails the extension cord with the hedge trimmers blades. Suddenly, at the worst possible time in the game, your tv goes dead, the media center pc crashes and the old lady will soon be in your face nagging you to fix the extension cord. All the while *you'll* be missing the game.
So the moral of the story here is to *always* place outdoor receptacles on their own circuits.
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wrote:

If the wife is in there nagging you to fix the cord, the rest is moot. You will never be able to finish watching the game in peace until you reset the breaker and fix the cord ... or give her another cord. Hopefully you can get her to wait for a commercial.
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wrote:

More than that. Always place the TV on its own circuit , and always place the media center pc on its own circuit.
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