Darn thieves!

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LOL... You think they are rare -- the ones that are shown on TV in the more urban areas are only about 5% of them that exist in such areas...
Thank 9/11 and government grants but traffic cameras are out there pretty much everywhere in the US now to be able to keep a lookout for trouble at many levels of the government...
Traffic cameras and interconnected radio communications systems for first responders have gotten hundreds of millions of dollars in government funding in the past 10 years...
~~ Evan
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On 11/24/2010 12:31 AM, Evan wrote:

You must not live in flyover country. Out here in upper midwest, there are many stretches where there is not even an overpass or elevated structure for 10-15 miles at a time to mount a camera on, interstate or 2-lane state road or city street. I work for the govt, and have been well trained in spotting potential camera locations. For a highway camera, you need height, power or room for a solar grid, and a nearby phone line for the IP connection. The whole country is not like California or the eastern urban centers. Around here, they are pretty much limited to the concrete rivers where the local interstate passes through town, and the major surface street intersections. Local TV stations may have a few 'live cams' as well, mounted on the local high spots, but about all they can resolve is looking to see how fast headlights are moving, or if brakes are being applied. The cameras are not hard to spot- the little half-ball silver or smoke-color enclosures jump right at you, once you have seen a few.
And for OP- now that I understand situation better, my 'pink paint' idea is sounding better and better. Lay them out upside down in parking lot back at the shop, and paint the backs some dayglo color. Maybe put a tamper-proof foil sticker on back. And in the flyer to the scrap yards, and the demo for local TV stations and papers, show exactly what they look like, and give a number to call for anyone that sees one running loose. Stripping sprayed paint off mill-finish aluminum is a labor-intensive and tedious process.
--
aem sends...


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Apparently you live in way low tech world aem...
You work for the government in spotting camera locations ? LOL... Apparently not so well trained... Yes you do need height for a camera to be useful... However you do not need an overpass or a bridge to install them on... In fact such installations are VERY vulnerable to vandalism and do not provide the best vantage point for being able to use the cameras as more than a stationary feed... If someone can spray paint the side of the bridge they can easily spray paint the camera dome as well...
Modern highway monitoring systems utilize cameras mounted on towers usually off axis from the driver's line of sight if they are using proper care and caution in driving down the road... The cameras are pan/tilt/zoom capable and can when installed at a strategic location sweep the roadway in both directions... Modern cameras can even have a night vision capability if required, although not all do...
These towers will often times contain weather sensors to allow for real time detection of potentially adverse conditions which would effect the safety of the roadway and prompt sanding or salting operations to be initiated...
Often located near such towers are the inductive detector loops which measure both vehicle speeds and provide a count of the traffic passing over them to allow the highway and transportation departments to have data available to them for determining where money should be spent on periodic maintenance tasks...
As far as being located near a phone line for IP connection, what century are you living in -- due to the MILES involved in distances on a highway these installations are usually all installed on a fiber optic backbone which is owned and maintained by the state department of highways or transportation and buried either beside the roadway or in the median where it connects many transportation data communications functions and runs back to some central location where the computer infrastructure is located without using the PSTN... DSL service for miles and miles and miles along highways for such equipment would cost the state DOT megabucks and would not have the reliability and durability of a dedicated buried fiber optic line located in an area where no one will ever be digging anything without the authorities closely supervising...
The power is the big factor... However, buried lines near the highway can feed such equipment without attracting attention to it like wires strung on poles would...
If you have cell phone service along the highway, it would not be a gigantic stretch of the imagination or technology used to install DOT dedicated fiber and power facilities to install a traffic camera system...
So please, let's not base what little is seen of the low-res public feeds from traffic cameras on the news or even on the internet in some areas as factual knowledge of what the monitoring locations are truly capable of...
~~ Evan
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On 11/24/2010 2:20 PM, Evan wrote:

You must live in a real rich area, then. The state I am in, Michigan, and the state I am from and still spend time in, Indiana, are flat broke. They can barely afford salt, or patching potholes, or an engineer to see the relationship between those two activities. I doubt five percent of the road miles in this state have cameras. And I KNOW there are no state-owned fiber trunks down the main roads.
Only area near here I am aware of that has a California-style traffic monitoring system is metro Chicago. In MI, a few cities have 'problem stretches' with cameras, but only in those problem areas, which are primarily badly-designed highways where big trucks keep falling off the curves in icy weather.
And yes, I HAVE seen what a fancy camera in a ball on a pole can do. The place I work has about 30 of them. including around the perimeter and on the high points of the building.
--
aem sends...

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Marking them is another possibility they're looking at.
There are no cameras near this location. It is in a remote location.
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On Wed, 24 Nov 2010 09:33:53 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

The traffic cameras do not usually have the resolution to identify a person, particularly at night. They are just there to verify that traffic is flowing. The stop light cameras are higher resolution since they are used in court. These are usually set up by a private company that gets 35-40% of the revenue. There will be quite a number of cameras per intersection shooting each light from a couple of angles. We are having a big stink here about these cameras in Naples. The state is now saying they won't use them for "failure to fully stop on right turn on red" violations and the vendor wants to pull out because that is where most of his revenue comes from. It turns out people don't really run enough red lights to pay for the cameras.
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On Nov 24, 11:00am, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Wow, ok, its clear you have no idea how traffic monitoring works...
At all... Whether or not the traffic is flowing is not determined visually via cameras but with inductive detector loops in the pavement which in addition to being able to provide traffic count information can also be used to provide speed information when used in pairs, as the time between passing the first loop and the second loop can be used to indicate speed...
These are the same sort of loops that detect the presence of a car stopped at a traffic signal to prompt the lights to cycle...
You are driving at such speed on the highway so that you will not usually notice such detector loops unless you are specifically looking out for them...
As far as camera resolutions and whatnot, again, clearly you do not have correct information as to what modern cameras are capable of... The public would have no reason to see the secured hi-res feeds from such cameras which are typically used for law enforcement purposes only...
~~ Evan
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On Wed, 24 Nov 2010 10:59:11 -0800 (PST), Evan

It may just be your state but the traffic cameras here (Florida) are used for gauging traffic flow, spotting accidents, dispatching emergency crews and updating the traffic status signs along the road. When people started the big brother complaints they actually showed the feed from the cameras. You can see what kind of vehicle is but you can't read the tag. I understand they make some very high resolution cameras (like the red light cameras) but the ones along the road are usually not that good. It is probably a bandwidth issue
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On Nov 23, 8:41am, "Stormin Mormon"

That will only work in that one state... A determined and organized thief will continue to steal and simply take them to a less strict scrap yard or will shred the metal first and sell it bulk in containers where it is unrecognizable as something which is stolen and should not be recycled...
Taking the time to weld the fasteners in place to retain the reflectors to the guard rail will require the thieves to carry additional equipment which will demonstrate a clear intent to steal as they would need a grinder or a torch to remove the welded fasteners... This will make finding the thieves easier in the long run as it isn't something which can be done out of a little Honda hatchback...
~~ Evan
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On Tue, 23 Nov 2010 12:28:29 -0800 (PST), Evan

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wrote:

4" x 8" x 1/8" thick. A box of 125 weighs slightly over 80 lbs with reflective tape. Don't know how much they weigh without the tape.
One can only suspect why they're being stolen.
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On Wed, 24 Nov 2010 17:42:32 -0800, Smitty Two

Classic!
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wrote in message

Speaking from experience? Sorry, you left yourself open for that one.
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Cheap way to start a subway.
R
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Presuming you have some extra thread left over or use slightly longer lag bolts. Purchase or have specially made, some reverse threaded 7/16" nuts.
Install reflector using normal lag bolt, washer and nut. Then install second reverse threaded nut after first.
When two nuts.. meet.. Tack weld them together.. No mater which way they turn the double nut assembly it won't move.
To remove, grind off tack weld, back off each nut appropriately. Lag threads will remain intact and undamaged. .

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<...snipped...>

Not that funny.
--
Make it as simple as possible, but no simpler.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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Cory wrote:

Here's the fix:
Obviously the use of bolted-on Aluminum is the result of a political decision. Steel would be cheaper and (obviously) last longer.
Without question the Aluminum-post-provider is a relative of the highway purchasing agent.
So, then, the fix is to approach the supplier and convince him to promote steel posts to his brother-in-law. He can sell them for more on than the current Aluminum post for the reason that they won't be stolen!
I know the whole idea is spooky, but that's the way the world works.
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Smitty Two wrote:

1. That's all they had. 2. The screw supplier is related to the highway department's purchasing agent. 3. To a man with a wrench, every problem can be solved with a screw.
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Any man will select a screw if one is available.
Harry K
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wrote:

It's not men who do the selection.
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