Cutting metal downspouts


What do guys use to cut metal downspouts? I tried a hacksaw and while it cut, it took awhile and gave me an uneven cut.
Also, what is used to make the ends fit into elbows and such? Is there a special tool for this? I guess the word is crimp for those ends.
Thank U
Larry
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snips to cut downspout. needle nose for crimping
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On Aug 25, 2:27 pm, snipped-for-privacy@web.com wrote:

Snips to cut ...but if oyu;re doing a lot, an abrasive blade on a chop saw.
to crimp......doable with long nose pliers but here's the "right" tool
http://www.classicgutters.com/Nehemiah/00000139.html
cheers Bob
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A quality metal fine toothed hacksaw blade or snips if I don't want to save and use the other piece.
I suspect but have never tried an old plywood blade backwards in a circ saw would cut it cleaner. That is the way I cut siding, both vinyl and metal.
There is a crimper tool but I used needle-nosed pliers with a grip and twist motion.
Colbyt
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Google "sheet metal crimper" -- you want the 5-blade kind.
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On Tue, 25 Aug 2009 16:27:00 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@web.com wrote:

Clean the end with a metal file! Snips can get you close to an even cut after the saw. Then freshen with a file.
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On Tue, 25 Aug 2009 16:27:00 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@web.com wrote:

I was in Harbor Freight one day and saw this on sale; http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?ItemnumberD829 [14" chop saw]
That $75 has saved me *so* much aggravation-- and probably $75 in hacksaw blades. [picked up a box of blades when I bought the saw last year, but haven't needed one yet.]
I've cut bolts & rebar & the ball off a trailer hitch-- and a crapload of angle iron and i-beams with it.

Never saw it in the store to see how cheap it is- but this should work on aluminum ; http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber“192 [5 Blade Crimper]
Jim
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I've always wondered how one of those cut-off saws compares to using an abrasive metal cutting blade on my DeWalt miter saw.
I've cut all sorts of metal, from aluminum angle iron to steel rod to garage door tracks on my DeWalt. Other than melting the insert and burning the collection bag, it seems to do the job.
How is a dedicated cut-off saw different?
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DerbyDad03 wrote: ...

They won't be melting the insert and burning the collection bag, mostly...
Functionally, no substantive difference; detail-wise quite a lot...
Typically 14" abrasive wheel-->greater rim speed and capacity (reach)
Don't have problem of plastic inserts and any spark-catcher will not be fabric
Built-in clamping device
Primarily won't end up w/ metal shavings and other cruddy effects on the precision woodworking tool.
It's the tool for the specific purpose.
--


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-snip-
For me, the biggest benefit, other than it being almost ready to go, no blade to change, it doesn't muck up my Bosch & my garage with metal filings. Most of my metal cutting is rebar, or rusty crap that I don't want near my miter saw.
Also, since I'm not the best of housekeepers, I like to use the metal cutters & grinders outside in the driveway so I'm not spraying sparks into sawdust piles.
Jim
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re: ...so I'm not spraying sparks into sawdust piles.
In the garage workshop where I use the radial arm saw to cut steel plates, the owner keeps an old (really old) 2 x 10 propped up against the wall behind the saw to protect the drywall. There's a spray bottle of water nearby and we dampen the plank before (and during) the cutting.
Sometimes we forget the "and during" part but the little tiny flames usually catch our eye before they become a problem. <g>
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On Aug 25, 4:27 pm, snipped-for-privacy@web.com wrote:

Use double cut tin snips. Check sources like Wiss for specifics. This is what tradesmen commonly use for any kind of round sheet metal pipe or square ducting (single piece). There are also small double cut snips from more obscure sources that body shop guys like. The ones I have are French and they came from J. C, Whitney IIRC.

Box stores have straight and angled crimpers. Check Harbor Freight, too.
Joe
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