Cutting holes in interior walls

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I live in pittsburgh too, the plastrer can be unreal hard.
Because of this I mark the wall and use a drill, first drill holes at corners, then use the bit to drill to drag the bit and connect the holes.
Its not pretty but far less dusty and no constant replacing of blades
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Picture".........
http://zekfrivolous.com/wall/wall.JPG
Greg
+++++++++++
Wow, that's an interesting picture. I've never seen anything like that, but I also never heard of rock lath plaster before.
In the picture, is the brownish top of the picture the inside of the wall, or is it the wall surface that shows when standing in the room?
I own a property that was built in the late 1940's. It has regular drywall/sheetrock throughout but all of the sheetrock is double layered -- two layers of regular 1/2-inch sheetrock. I don't know if it is true, but someone said to me that they believe that sheetrock was a newer form of finishing walls at that time and the old-timers didn't think 1/2-inch sheetrock would be strong enough so they double-rocked everything. I guess wall finishing was going through a transition in the late 40's and early 50's. A house I grew up in was built in 1954 and it has what is normal for today -- regular 1/2-inch sheetrock walls throughout.
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...
The brown paper is the inside. In my old house, was newer, the ceilings had two sheets of drywall with a plaster skin coat, very smooth. The living areas had a texture. I would assume all the walls had two sheets.
Greg
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zek wrote:

Thanks again. I guess that means it is what RBM suggested -- at least for the walls --- rock lath plaster.
Looks like for the walls they nailed the drywall to the studs, then did a "brown coat" (rough coat) of plaster, then a thin white finish coat of plaster. And I guess for the ceilings it was easier and lighter to just do two layers of drywall and then a finish coat of white plaster.
At least now if I ever run into the same thing you have I'll know what it is.
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**I've seen double layer sheetrock done in newer houses. The first layer is nailed and the second layer is glued to the first. It's a clean smooth job with no nail indents
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zek wrote:

That's what my '60s house has - rock lath, brown coat plaster (lotsa little stones to dull blades), and a thin white coat.
I use a DeWalt high speed rotary tool w/circle cutter and carbide bit on ceilings, and either the same tool or my RotoZip w/carbide bit to freehand the wall outlets - always using a shop vac close to the bit to minimize dust.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
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Do you live in the bomb shelter pictured on your home page?
That might explain the walls you have.
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I had lived accross the street from that shelter. I never went in it.that house cost about 50% more because of constructed. Lightning hit an outside antenna, caused fire in basement. Destroyed some sheets he had drawn for an animation for HBO.. Re did them and it was caalled Alice in the magic bubble. Nations first fallout shelter for a residence.
Greg
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