Cutting down noise from outside, already have double pane windows.

I live near an interstate highway and am trying to cut down on the noise coming into my bedrooms. I already have double pane windows and this definitely helps some, but I'm interesting in finding ways to further cut down on the noise. I've seen removable noise plugs for windows of a noise reducing matrial, but this blocks all light when they're in the windows. Are the other options? One idea is adding some sort of storm windows, but I've not seen those before for modern 2 pane windows, just the older single pane windows.
Any suggestions would be appreciated.
Thanks, Steve
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There's always the option of replacing with triple pane windows. I am getting my windows replaced this fall anyway, so I decided to upgrade to triple pane. I'll provide my feedback and experience here when it gets done.

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That is a possibility thou I'm not sure the level of 1) cost 2) additional benefit vs double pane
Any thoughts on those 2 concerns?
Thanks, Steve

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Steve W) wrote:
-> I live near an interstate highway and am trying to cut down on the -> noise coming into my bedrooms. I already have double pane windows and -> this definitely helps some, but I'm interesting in finding ways to -> further cut down on the noise. I've seen removable noise plugs for -> windows of a noise reducing matrial, but this blocks all light when -> they're in the windows. Are the other options? One idea is adding some -> sort of storm windows, but I've not seen those before for modern 2 -> pane windows, just the older single pane windows. -> -> Any suggestions would be appreciated. What about walls/fences and plantings? What separates your property from the highway? Put up a privacy fence or, better yet, a brick or concrete wall.
Plant some tall, evergreen shrubs. Plant them rather close together.
You could also wear earplugs when you sleep!
--
8^)~~~ Sue (remove the x to e-mail)
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It's in a townhouse development. There is a 2 story soundwall and I'm a few hundred feet from the highway. The soundwall definitely helps, but it's on the 3rd floor that the noise is an issue (where the bedrooms are). There's already a tree in front of my house which is growing, but it's only 10 years old and not tall enough to fully block the house. I wish they would build another story on the soundwall, but that's unlikely. I guess sound is the tradeoff of living near a subway station that's in the middle of an interstate.
Steve
(Steve W) wrote:

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I think you're gunna be stuck with the earplug solution!
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Steve W) wrote:
-> It's in a townhouse development. There is a 2 story soundwall and I'm -> a few hundred feet from the highway. The soundwall definitely helps, -> but it's on the 3rd floor that the noise is an issue (where the -> bedrooms are). There's already a tree in front of my house which is -> growing, but it's only 10 years old and not tall enough to fully block -> the house. I wish they would build another story on the soundwall, but -> that's unlikely. I guess sound is the tradeoff of living near a subway -> station that's in the middle of an interstate. -> -> Steve ->
-> (Steve W) wrote: -> > -> > -> I live near an interstate highway and am trying to cut down on the -> > -> noise coming into my bedrooms. I already have double pane windows and -> > -> this definitely helps some, but I'm interesting in finding ways to -> > -> further cut down on the noise. I've seen removable noise plugs for -> > -> windows of a noise reducing matrial, but this blocks all light when -> > -> they're in the windows. Are the other options? One idea is adding some -> > -> sort of storm windows, but I've not seen those before for modern 2 -> > -> pane windows, just the older single pane windows. -> > -> -> > -> Any suggestions would be appreciated. -> > -> > What about walls/fences and plantings? What separates your -> > property from the highway? Put up a privacy fence or, better -> > yet, a brick or concrete wall. -> > -> > Plant some tall, evergreen shrubs. Plant them rather close -> > together. -> > -> > You could also wear earplugs when you sleep!
--
8^)~~~ Sue (remove the x to e-mail)
~~~~~~
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I highly recommend the earplug solution.
Alternately, you could move your bedroom to the basement.
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W) wrote:

eventually. We lived next to an interstate for 13 years; the house was about 125 yds from the highway, with pretty much nothing in between. And after a while, you become so accustomed to the sound of the traffic, that if an accident or bad weather closes the highway at night, the *absence* of noise will wake you up.
I'd like to offer a few suggestions, though, for reducing the noise problem further. Your double-pane windows are great: we had a huge reduction in noise when we replaced single-pane windows with double-pane. It's important to do this on *all* sides of the house, not just the side facing the highway. Changing out all your doubles to triples will be *very* expensive. Adding storm windows to the existing doubles will provide nearly as much benefit, at a *much* lower cost.
Any windows in exterior doors should be double-pane also. Same goes for basement windows, if applicable.
Replace metal exterior doors (including storm doors) with wooden ones.
Seal any and all air leaks that you can find. If air can get in, so can sound.
Replace any metal through-the-roof vents for kitchen or bathroom fans with plastic ones: they transmit waaaaaay less sound to the inside of the home.
Insulate your attic heavily. You'd be *amazed* how much noise comes through the roof.
Obviously, you want to keep the sound outside the house as much as possible, but there are also things you can do on the inside to help absorb the sound that does get in. If you have hardwood floors, carpet them (or at least use area rugs). Consider replacing ceramic tile floors with vinyl tiles or linoleum. Bulky drapes and upholstered furniture also absorb a lot of sound.
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Thanks Doug! Those are some great suggestions.
-- Steve
snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in message
(Steve W) wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Steve W) wrote in message

To be most effective multiple glazing should be of different thicknesses. The different thickness sheets of glass resonate to different wave lengths.
Flanking paths for sound, such as cracks around windows and around electrical recepticals, can be a major problem.
Your idea of strom windows might work with the first of these two problems. Expanding foam might help with the other.
TB
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Some more info regarding sound control windows is at http://www.soundproofing.org/infopages/windowplug.htm
On 21 Jul 2004 21:38:26 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Steve W) wrote:

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In addition to this... how about adding plants, lots of them. Tall evergreens (so you don't lose the sound proofing in winter) and all sorts of other bushes that are higher than the window heights. Good luck.
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