Cutting A Sheetrock Panel

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Stop storing your tools at the bottom of your swimming pool, and that won't happen. <g>
Seriously, though -- you ought to look at getting a dehumidifier for wherever it is that you keep your tools. I *don't* have a problem with my tools rusting, whether I've used them on drywall or not. It's an environment issue, not a drywall issue. And I repeat: Iron doesn't rust unless it gets wet. It *can't*: rust is _by definition_ *hydrated* iron oxide. Iron oxide is black, not red. It doesn't -- can't -- become rust without the presence of water.
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On Jan 18, 4:58 am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Harry K
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Not enough to rust the blades on *my* utility knives -- but I don't store my tools in a humid area, either. In any event, it certainly isn't gypsum that's causing rust on tools that you've _washed the gypsum off of_.
It's water.
Either you're not getting them as dry as you think you are, or you're storing your tools in a humid place. Or maybe your cat pees in your toolbox.
Get a dehumidifier for your workshop or wherever it is you store your tools, and you won't have a rust problem. And shut the door to keep the cat out.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Yes blades are fine but either the sheetrock dust or the spackle dust will tear up the bearings on lot's of tools. I think it's the spackle dust.
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Use the rotoZip or drywall saw to cut flush to the inside edge of the studs.
Cut two straight scabs at lest 2" longer than the height of the opening and then attach them to the studs while pulling them flush to the backside of the drywall.. That is why you make them 2" taller than the opening.
Attach the drywall to the scabs. I use 1x11/2 or 2x2 cabs depending on what I have handy when I need one.
You can buy a cheap cutout tool at Harborfreight for about $20.
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Colbyt wrote:

or just buy a new piece of drywall and cut the old flush with the stud with a keyhole saw and then after the piece is out cut it back 3/4" or so with a utility knife.
nate
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I've done this for years with a jig saw. Simple as can be, just bring the blade to its lowest point of travel (maximum cutting depth) and mark off the cutting depth you want from the platen, then remove the blade and break off the unwanted portion and grind the back of the blade to a profile similar to a new blade. Reinsert blade and proceed to cut drywall, plywood, whatever, to exact depths. When blade is dull, save it for a pattern for another one, and mark it with a Sharpie for the depth it cuts. For decent low priced jigsaws, check out Harbor Freight, maybe eBay. If your jigsaw has a dust blower you can follow a line quite well and the cut out will fit back precisely in the hole anyway, so nearly invisible repairs are possible.
Joe
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I like to make the cut in the center of the stud bay(s) and not struggle with that cut down the center of the stud. Much easier cutting, much faster with almost any tool. When it is repair time, screw a scrap metal stud or 1x along the cut drywall edges and screw in the replacement piece. You can even go the next level with a butt board type install that pulls the butt joint down where it finishes much like a taper joint. Some Level 5 drywallers are going to this system on new work.
www.trim-tex.com/submittal/BUTTBOARD-sumittal%20sheet.pdf
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mcp6453 wrote:

Well, I'm no pro, but I'll jump in anyway-
No good way if you want to reuse the cut-out section for a patch. I usually scrounge a hunk of rock to patch with, then cut a hole in the center of the area to have something to grab. Use a straightedge and a sharp utility knife or carpet knife to score away at your edge lines very carefully. Idea is to not crumble the cut edge of the drywall NOT being removed, so you can get a clean joint. Take your time and make lots of passes, changing blades as needed. At a certain point, you will be able to grip to open side and snap it off.
Alternative method for impatient people like me- cut the drywall flush with the studs, using a drywall hand saw. (power saws tend to cause nail pops.) Screw 2x3 cleats to the exposed side of the stud, and screw your patch to those.
aem sends...
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I'm not a professional, but I've done this with a normal utility knife -- just start scoring deeper and deeper until you get through the depth of the drywall. If I had dozens of these to cut, I'd get a rotozip, but one or two will only take 5 minutes to do by hand.
Josh
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wrote:

With JUST one I would just draw it out with a level and a pencil and cut it with a utility knife with a NEW blade ....Just keep scoring it till it pops thru.....Use scabs on the studs or a piece of strapping screwed to the back of the sheetrock on the wall to put it back...If you do screw a piece of strapping to the back of the sheetrock be carefull the screws pop through the strapping or piece of 1X and bite you if your not paying attention...BTDT.......
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Forget about an electric tool unless you are willing to deal with a big mess. Use a stud finder to locate the edges of the studs and mark these with a pencil. Use a utility knife with a new blade to cut between the lines. This will take more time than an electric tool, but you'll get a narrower gap with the utility knife and perhaps a faster repair time.
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mcp6453 wrote:

utility knife
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