Crown molding on a cathedral ceiling

Looks like I'm going to be using 5" crown molding on a cathedral bedroom ceiling. It's paint-grade, but because the molding profile is so large I will not be able to fake the joints.
The problems are:
o    Where the level ceiling line meets the rake, the plumb cut     on the rake molding will not match the profile on the level;     it will be wider. I was thinking of some sort of stop block     in the corner, but this doesn't seem ideal, or easy.
o    The ceiling on the level runs moves up and away from the top     of the molding, creating a gap. I could place a filler strip in     it, but that wouldn't match the rake profile. This also mitigates     for the use of stop blocks in the corners.
Any creative ideas would be appreciated.
p.
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wrote:

I've done lots of crown. Difficult to describe without seeing your situation. Take a look at the base molding. Make returns to the wall or run the molding straight into the wall, whichever looks better. (I don't want to create a fight here, but...) I've found that women have a knack knowing what looks best.
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Phisherman wrote:

Problem is, we don't want to terminate the crown when it meets the rake wall, we want it to turn and climb up the slope.
p.
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"pb" wrote in message

Your filler has to go on the wall not the ceiling, then when you run the rake, the profile will match on your plumb cut. You already know you're trying to use a crown made for a 90 degree angle to try to use for something other than 90. Not a lot of choices without filler on the wall or having custom crown made for the degree your cathedral slopes.
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bogden wrote:

I take it you mean canting the level run upward, so the rake sees it at a right angle. Interesting, I hadn't thought of that. But even with the relatively low pitch roof - 3½ on 12 - I don't see that looking good, on first consideration. Have you ever done this, and how did it turn out?
The custom rake crown is the ideal solution, but it's not going to happen.
p.
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"pb" wrote in message

We've done something like it. It was a double oak build out (3 pc. crown). The wall build out was thicker than the ceiling, so it really didn't show as such. It showed as a 3 piece. We had ripped down the ceiling, to whatever was needed, but ripped the thickness on both oak bands. Didn't try to get it all on the one band.
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bogden wrote:

Your word picture has perhaps pointed out what I think is a solution. Place the level piece first, relieving the top so it fits to the ceiling, and mitering the end normally. Now make a transition piece, mitered to the level piece and splay-mitered to the coming rake piece.
Gonna be challenging to cut that transition piece, though.
That should work, and be geometrically correct, for inside miters. The problem I still have is on a closet that comes off of one level run. It's side follows the roof slope, but it's face is level. The outside miter between the two would not seem to bow to the above approach.
p.
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use a bevel square to determine the angle then divide it in half. cut each molding with that angle. perfect fit every time (maybe a little caulk).
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How about a picture? PJ

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Installing crown molding on a sloped ceiling is no more difficult than installing the crown on a horizontal ceiling. For a sloped ceiling all you are adding to the job are turns of the crown in a vertical direction. In other words, when installing the horizontal crown and you get to a corner where you want to turn upwards you make both a horizontal turn and a vertical turn in the corner and then proceed up the sloped ceiling. Visit us on line at www.compoundmiter.com for the tools and information that will make your crown molding job fun and exciting and most of all easy. Crown Molding & Trim: Install It Like A PRO! Free 0n-line tech support. Questions call toll free 866-544-2016
Do-It-Yourself Crown Molding & Trim: Install It Like A PRO!
Sincerely yours Wayne Drake, President CompoundMiter, Inc.
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