crimp connections for 110v wiring

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http://www.mikeholt.com/mojonewsarchive/Safety-HTML/HTML/NewsFromCPSC~20030502.htm
I wonder what it cost them to take care of the building inspector, either financially, or with a bag of cement.
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spudnuty wrote:

http://www.mikeholt.com/mojonewsarchive/Safety-HTML/HTML/NewsFromCPSC~20030502.htm
but I didn't think it was THAT expensive.
In addition to cold creep in the wiring FAQ (which was substantially fixed with new alloy wire and CO/ALR devices) another major problem is aluminum oxide which forms rapidly on clean aluminum and is an insulator.
The Consumer Product Safety Council had extensive research done on aluminum connections. The professional engineer involved in the research wrote a paper based on the research - at http://www.inspect-ny.com/aluminum/alreduce.htm The paper gives a wide range of fixes from the crimp tool you talk about to wire nuts and others. There is a detailed procedure for using wirenuts which includes applying antioxide paste and then abrading the surface to remove oxides. The author does not think wirenuts are an improvement without the procedure. There is, as far as I know, only one wirenut UL listed for aluminum wire (from Ideal) - the author specifically does not like it. --------------------------- Do garden variety crimps, like panduit, work reliably on #14 and lagrer wire?
bud--
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Yes. But as was mentioned before, they will not work with garden variety crimp tools. This doesn't mean to have to spend a fortune - just get one that's more than two flat or almost-flat jaws that do nothing but flatten the sleeve. They need to have a groove into which the sleeve fits snugly - that keeps the crimp from moving sideways. Some tools have several grooves to fit different size crimps. Fancier tools use different dies that you install based on the work you're doing. This is probably overkill for household work because you're likely to be working with at least two wire sizes - 12 and 14, so you'll want to be able to switch quickly.
On the opposite jaw, there'll be a tooth which creates a deep dimple in the metal sleeve. The sleeves have a split on one side - a seam, actually. The whole system works best when the dimple is made at a point that's 180 degrees opposite that seam. This is one reason why the translucent connectors are better - it's easier to see the seam, so you can work more quickly.
If you stay tuned, I'll post some pictures over the weekend, showing the tool, and properly made connections.
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Because a properly made crimp connection made with the proper tool is far superior to a wire nut . For a long time many electricians have used a Buchannon crimper when good connections are needed. In fact, in some localities, such as in Fort Wayne, Indiana, to this day, a crimp made with with a Buchannon crimper is THE ONLY acceptable connection allowed for connecting the equipment ground wires in residences in order to past an electrical inspection in that city.
This_IS_ the tool that most electricians in this country (USA) use to make crimp connections on 12 and 14 gauge wires:
http://www.twacomm.com/catalog/model_C-24.htm?ref=Froogle
The first time that I bought one it was $28 (US).
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volts500 wrote:

At least I have not experienced wire nut causing trouble. Crimping is permanent vs wire nuts, you can undo it when needed. But which one to use depends on the situation. Tony
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Yeah but you were working for Samuel Insull* at the time.
(* I was going to say Thomas Edison but thought I'd make it less obvious.)
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I'm paranoid enough that whenever I use the crimp tool to put on quick connects, spades, rings, whatever, I will crimp then solder it. The insulation is partly damaged but at least I know the connection is good and won't pull out.
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You have the wrong tool. If crimps are done right, it's extremely difficult to pull them apart. The force you'd need would be far beyond anything the wires would normally experience inside a junction box. And besides, whether you're wiring a home or a trailer hitch, you're supposed to route and support wires in such a way that they will never be subject to the kind of forces that would cause the crimps to fail.
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Oh I'm sure I have a crappy tool.
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Steve Kraus wrote:

My recollection is that soldering a crimp has been shown to weaken it.
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When you are soldering a barell connector you only crimp it enough to hold the wires together unttil the solder sets. That way the solder has room to wick into the barrel. Be sure you have a big enough iron, think mass. If the iron is too small it cools down and has to slowly heat up the joint. That is what burns the insulation. The old time sparkies used an iron with a tip the size of your thumb and a lot of copper in it.
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I think there are two types of crimps being discussed here. This type... http://www.panduit.com/search/product_details.asp?NP00001+151+3000387+5000013&Ne=1&region=USA&recName=BSN10%2DD
has no place for solder, nor does it need it if properly installed.
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I got my crimp connectors from Home Depot and they mate with a almost clear to white cap that can only be used once. The crimp tool they sell has a red handle and can crimp three types of crimps. Many here might disagree with me but I use plyers to twist the wire a few turns, then cut it off snug and then place the copper crimp ring over the wires and crimp it. Then I place the cap on and I wouldn't worry about the connection.
J
Mr_bill wrote:

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You know what they need? A stiff backing. That will keep them from deforming.

I'll bet. They need some way to attach them firmly. Maybe put the sleeves in the form of a cone and screw them on.
You could make the backing out of plastic.

Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
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Make sure the connectors are rated for whatever type of wire you joining/splicing. The proper crimping tool has the appearance of a large bolt cutter or rebar cutter A cheap source is www.princessauto.com

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What's wrong with wirenuts? They are about the easiest things to use of anything. I would NOT use crimp conns. on household wiring. They are made for automotive and other low voltage use, and in all honesty, they are crappy for that use. When I wire something in my car, I use small wirenuts. They are easier to install, cheaper, and less prone to corrosion. I like to fill the open ends of wirenuts used on a car with clear silicone to keep water out. I really do not understand why you want to use cromps on home wiring, and additionally, I doubt they are legal according to the code. Use what the code says. If you use crimps and have a fire, your insurance might be rejected fro having non-standard non-approved wiring.
I suggest you forget this whole idea and just continue to use wirenuts.
Mark

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Corrosion: If you've seen corroded crimp connectors, you never found the good ones. It's nearly impossible to find them in retail stores.
Code: Don't spout theories without checking them first. They're actually legal in quite a few municipalities.
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Buchanan Crimp Connectors
are the way to go
http://www.idealindustries.com/wt/CrimpConnectors.nsf
cheers Bob
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

I do love their crimp tools -- besides being the best electrical crimpers I've ever used, they do a great job of securing end caps on bicycle gear and brake housing -- since they crimp from four sides at once, they leave the housing round.
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