Covering laminate floor in kitchen

The size is 12' x 6' and i just don't like the look of laminated floor in the kitchen. A HAndyman recommended that I cover it with self sticking vinyl by Armstrong for budget reasons. He said the floor is solid, so all I need is to cover it myself. he refused to take the job, because its so easy that I could do it, and thought it was a crime to take the money to do it .
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The size is 12' x 6' and i just don't like the look of laminated floor in the kitchen. A HAndyman recommended that I cover it with self sticking vinyl by Armstrong for budget reasons. He said the floor is solid, so all I need is to cover it myself. he refused to take the job, because its so easy that I could do it, and thought it was a crime to take the money to do it . Is there anything that i should do to the wooden floor before adding the tiles, other than sweeping and soft mop it?
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Glued or floating? If he said it's so easy I'm thinking floating.
If floating, just take it up. You don't want it naturally expanding and contracting with something on top.
    "Well, it looks great at 72 degrees and 40% humidity."
Hardest part should be getting the first piece up. The rest should come apart like a puzzle.
    "Well, it looks great at 72 degrees and 40% humidity."
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Red Green wrote:

worthwhile investment. And ugly as it is, that laminate would likely last longer than self-stick tiles would. In damp heavy-traffic areas like a kitchen in front of the sink, they have a real bad habit of floating around, popping off, or just getting nasty black joints.
I'd just put a cheap throw rug with a non-slip backing over it, while you save up for a proper sheet vinyl floor. Kitchen size remnants are pretty cheap, if you can stand to hit the local flooring stores once a week for a while till a piece big enough, in a pattern you can stand, shows up. Then walk around back and talk to their contract installer while he is on a smoke break- a lot of them do side installs after work for cash, cheap. Mine sure didn't hesitate, and gave me a good price for good work.
aem sends...
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Unless there is something radically wrong with the existing laminate, there is no need to take it up to put down self-stick tiles. They will go over existing flooring.
However, I don't see what the compelling need to switch to viny tiles is. They look as bad or probably worse than laminate.
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Noel wrote:

Removing laminate flooring is even easier than putting it down. It's not nailed or glued - just unlock the pieces.
Save the pieces, though. They might come in handy for a small project.
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That's certainly not true of all laminate. With Pergo, which is probably the best known and leading brand, the pieces are glued together.

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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Ah, didn't know. I just put some down and the pieces simply clicked together.
The brand I used was "Legonate" - is that the difference?
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