Countertop ideas for a workbench?

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On 11/2/2012 12:47 AM, Smitty Two wrote:

Much depends on what you are planning to do on the bench, as others above have said. When I build mine, I wanted plastic laminate, however, a sheet was sooooo expensive that I quickly abandoned that. I finally used laminate flooring. I picked a pattern that was smooth and inexpensive. https://picasaweb.google.com/actodesco/OurFranklinHouse#5406334306941982338
It works pretty well, is cleanable and durable .... maybe not to hammer on, but, for the stuff I do, it's good. It is glued down to an OSB surface and edged with a rounded over piece of oak. For hammering, I have vice and an old stage weight that serves well. https://picasaweb.google.com/actodesco/OurFranklinHouse#5491673751739357826 I've since expanded it to L shaped, with the addition a few inches lower which is used for electronic stuff.
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On 10/31/2012 9:37 AM, SMS wrote:

Solid core doors work well. YOu should be able to ask for damaged doors - they usually go for about $10. You might consider edge banding the top and adding a masonite cap that can be replaced when necessary.
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wrote:

Sounds like a heluva deal at $25. A piece of masonite would cover the doorknob hole but I would put it in the back anyway.
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On 10/31/2012 10:37 AM, SMS wrote:

My work benches are 2 layers of 1/2 inch plywood. Unfinished surfaces were just varnished. Been a long time and I don't remember what it cost but don't think it was expensive.
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from experience:
1. make surface light colored and place diffuse lighting in a non- reflective position. 2. make surface robust, oil resistant, won't dent or scratch with over 40 awkward pounds set on it, and yet smooth for finding small parts 3. support, support, support in a manner that still allows you to get your knees under the top - anywhere. [you have no idea how irritating slight flexing can be.] 4. make kitchen counter height, but slightly higher to adjust to yourself. Too high and uncomfortable angle to work, too low and you're bent over all day [get roll around bar stools that quit moving when you apply sitting pressure and allow you to 'lean' against [slightly sitting on them] for support. That way, you can walk off, get whatever, come back, [roll around so you can move chair to different position - your hands may be holding something and you need to move that chair] and continue working with little effort. You have NO idea how tiring getting up and down from a work station can get. 5. be prepared to accept damage to your beautiful work bench. It will happen.Like the first dent in a new car.
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On Fri, 9 Nov 2012 06:21:53 -0800 (PST), Robert Macy

All good advice, but most too late for SMS who has the bench already. Personally, I don't see any benefit in "smooth" or "hard" Never have trouble seeing anything small on beat up and "dirty" (stained) soft wood workbench surfaces. I like that character. Dents keep small parts from rolling off. Just hang a foxtail and dustpan on a nail stuck in the side of the bench, and use them.
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Wouldn't a nail sticking out of the bench be a safety hazard? I mean, unless it's a safety nail that automatically retracts when nothing is hanging on it.
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wrote:

You put the hanger on the leg, under the bench
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On Fri, 09 Nov 2012 13:36:38 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Yeah, you want top overhang, but we're past the design part. Somebody just covered knee space. Most of my hanging nails are in the front top rails. Used to keep pipe wrenches on them until I went pegboard. And hammers between 2 nails, which was always a bad idea, because they can fall on your foot too easily.
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