cottage water pump

I'm new to this group, found alot of info and have a problem someone may have an answer too.
Just bought a very small cottage and |I'd still like to go up in winter. It get's pretty cold there -25 and I need a water pump system that could at least bring up 10 gallons for the weekends. I'm at about 40 feet higher than the lake which is another 30 feet out. I was thinking of the cheapest way possible using garden hose and a commercial pump. I know I'd have to break through ice and make sure to bring that pump inside and dry it every time, the hose would freeze but can't I let it drain back after I'm done pumping? What sort of economical pump would do the job? Has anyone a good solution to make this work?
Thanks for your help, Gino
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GINO wrote:

Hi, If I were you, I'd just take couple bottled water. 40 + 30 is quite a pull. Tony
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GINO wrote:

Heat trace. Talk to a pump or well supplier if your not afraid of spending a chunk of change. An axe and pail will do if your cheap.
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a pint is a pound so a gallon is 8 pounds and a five gallon jug is 40 pounds times 2 equals 80 pounds of fresh city drinking water. your email suggests canada so -25 may be centigrade which is -13 fahrenheit which is amazingly cold so bring the clean water inside your vehicle instead of on the back of a pickup truck. if you actually could figure out how to collect rainwater or lots of snow you'd still have to sanitize it with bleach just like that frozen lake which isn't exactly drinking water.
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Maybe what you need is a 'fireplug' in the lake. Put in a vertical pipe extending deeper than the worst freeze with a valve on top. Fill pipe completely with compressed air and close valve. To use, attach pump and open valve. The pipe in the ice cannot freeze as lonf as it's filled with air.
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Gino,
There is very little potable surface water in North America. If you plan to drink water, bring it with you or rethink this plan. The amount of work you describe with this temporary pump system seems to be more work than just carrying a couple of jugs of water up from the lake or from the grocery store.
Dave M.
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GINO wrote:

Any pump you use will have to be at the lake, or at least no more than about 26 feet above it. The 'no care' system would be a permanent pump left in the lake itself year round. The pump would have to be a submersible with the foot valve/back-flow valve removed and set at a depth below the deepest expected ice level. It would only be used to fill containers in the house through an 'air gap', i.e., open pipe pouring water down into the container. As soon as the pump shuts off, the pipe drains back.
Harry K
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