Cost of adding ridge vent to roof?


I would like to put a ridge vent on my house. I do not need shingles. The length is about 25 ft.
I realize that it is different prices in diff. parts of the country (US) but I was trying to get some idea. I am in NC (in a small town) Thks for any help.
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W. Wells wrote:

You should ask locally if you need a number you can rely on.
Adding a ridge vent requires intake ventilation lower down, typically the soffits. Without the complete ventilation circuit the ridge vent will not work very well. If you're just looking to cool down the attic, you may want to look at a thermostatically controlled mechanical vent.
R
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I'd say a guestimate is a few hundred bucks. The vent material isn't very much and you have the shingles. All that's required is to cut two runs down the peak, install the ridge vent, and reshingle.
As pointed out above, you do need adequate soffit intakes. Makes sure they are there and not blocked by insulation. Even if you use a power vent, and probably more so, you need adequate intake, though if it's a power vent, you could rely on gable or other vents for cross flow as opposed to vertical rise.
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wrote:

imho:
I had a guy come and replace mine. Considering the extra step would be running a circular saw down 25 feet, and back 25 feet. I'm guessing another hundred or two. So maybe 400?
Just a guess, but then the extra work comes from what is your current ventulation method? Gable vents, they will need to be covered/blocked. Then you need good soffet vents too. So this can add to the overall cost.
Now this is based on past conversations with a roofer, so not a roofer myself. Get a professional for a quote.
tom @ www.YourMoneyMakingIdeas.com
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wrote:

imho:
I had a guy come and replace mine. Considering the extra step would be running a circular saw down 25 feet, and back 25 feet. I'm guessing another hundred or two. So maybe 400?
Just a guess, but then the extra work comes from what is your current ventulation method? Gable vents, they will need to be covered/blocked. Then you need good soffet vents too. So this can add to the overall cost.
Why do gable vents need to be blocked? I have no gables on my house and the only attic venting is through several roof vents (non whirling type). I think probably a ridge vent would be beneficial but haven't checked into prices. Would my roof vents have to be blocked? Why? Thanks
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wrote:

This is what was explained to me. For ridge vents to work, air needs to be supplied very low. This way natural thermal convection can occure over the whole bottom of the roof sheathing. If there are gable vents, air will enter and go right out, and air will take the path of least resistance, causing stagnent air pockets of heat and humidity.

Same reason why gable vents would need blocking, per what was explained to me.

It made sense to me, since I would want air flow over the whole attic, no short cuts.
Now this came from talking to roofers and builders, so I suggest you do the same. Don't listen to me, I am a layperson.
tom @ www.Consolidated-Loans.info
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Your best and cheapest bet would be to just install an attic fan with temp/humidity control. Ridge vents do little for ventilation and you need soffit vents too for added cost.

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On Jan 31, 4:26 pm, snipped-for-privacy@backpacker.com wrote:

He should have and may very well have soffit vents already. If he does, then installing a ridge vent and a fan are about the same cost. But, after that, the attic fan, using electric, will always have operating cost. And fans are not without other downsides, like sucking conditioned air out of the house, especially if it's installed where there is inadequate intake.

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On 1 Feb 2007 05:20:40 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

You made a valid point, a properly sized ridge vent and set of sofet vents, will cost one time. Fans can be set wronge, like for 80F when the outside temps are 90F, and continue to cost money after installation.
Also, I have a strange prediction, I think cost of energy will be going up with time. Just a guess....
tom @ www.YourMoneySavingTips.com

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Yes a fan costs money- but I'd bet that once properly set will cost < $20/year for electricity as it will not run frequently in the fall and winter. Ridge and soffit are poor ventilation. Hoping the air will move isnt my way. A fan will help circulate. I have no soffit vents and will get the roof fan and will be happy with it. Older houses have no real soffits so that is an added cost. I feel for you guys if you cant afford the minmal power needed to run an attic fan. I bet you use candles too and a hand clothes washer!!!

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snipped-for-privacy@backpacker.com wrote:

gable ends( making sure i did not need any more soffit openings). i could feel the flow of air. the man also said i had good air flow, this was in the summer. i know my set up with ridge and soffit vents work. my home is a ranch in ohio.
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LayPerson Tom wrote:

the ridge vent.
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This is what was explained to me. For ridge vents to work, air needs to be supplied very low. This way natural thermal convection can occure over the whole bottom of the roof sheathing. If there are gable vents, air will enter and go right out, and air will take the path of least resistance, causing stagnent air pockets of heat and humidity.

Same reason why gable vents would need blocking, per what was explained to me.

It made sense to me, since I would want air flow over the whole attic, no short cuts.
Now this came from talking to roofers and builders, so I suggest you do the same. Don't listen to me, I am a layperson.
tom @ www.Consolidated-Loans.info
I should have thought of that. Certainly makes sense. Thanks
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