Cordless drill comparison - DeWalt and Ryobi

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I'm looking to replace an old (and not very good) Black and Decker 14.4v cordless drill with another cordless. I think I have my selections narrowed down to either the Ryobi P220C or the DeWalt DC759KA. The DeWalt is $199 and the Ryobi is $138.94 (after I add in for the battery charger and two batteries). I like the compactness of the DeWalt but it looks like the Ryobi has a few more bells-and-whistles (not sure if I would need them, though). It would be used primarily around the house - everything from light to moderately heavy duty. Both are 18v - the DeWalt has 450 in-ilbs of torque, I don't know what they Ryobi has. I guess my concern is with Ryobi's quality and the fact they are available only at Home Depot. Does anyone have an opinion on either drill (or any other for that matter). I'm leaning torwards an 18v with good torque power for those occasional heavy-duty jobs. And I also like the 1/2 chuck so I don't have to worry about bits being too large.
Thanks.
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brewman snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Well, I don't know any of the specifics about either drill, but I wouldn't buy a Ryobi anything. I'm surprised the Ryobi costs that much, I rate Ryobi right at the bottom of the line there along with B&D. And for that matter, DeWalt is owned by B&D so I'd exercise caution when buying any DeWalt tool. Personally, my experience with DeWalt is so-so. I have a palm sander and 3/8" corded drill which both work fine, but I have a jigsaw that broke (the main casting that holds everything just broke) and the part is not available to fix it.
Fine Woodworking had a review on cordless drills recently:
http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/pages/w00164.asp
Unfortunately you can't read the article online, you have to buy a back issue.
If I were you, I would look at Porter-Cable, Makita, Milwaukee, and I hear Panasonic cordless drills are very good. I'm sure others will offer plenty of opinions on this one.
Ken
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x-no-archive: yes

I have the Ryobi 18V that you mention. I have used it both commercially and in the home. It's a middle of the road tool. But the price was right, so I bought it. I have had no problems with it. And the first commercial job I did with it was to screw in over 2500 3.5" screws, often working in the rain. I also put in about 300 6" lag bolts into PT lumber that was not pre-drilled and it screwed them in just fine, plenty of torque, enough that I had to hang onto that drill with both hands. I've loaned the drill out to other people and it still worked just fine when I got it back. Right now a friend has in on a job and hopefully, I will get it back still working :)
I would buy another, just because of the price and the fact I had no problems with this one. It's a year old now.
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I had a Ryobi 14v that was mediocre quality, but I now have an 18v Ryobi kit that acually isn't bad for the price. The $138 you mentioned for a Ryobi seems high, though, for just a drill. Generally you can get a 5 piece kit with 2 batteries, etc for just a little more. Bill

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Check out Consumer Reports. They did a battery power tool comparo recently (maybe as much as a year ago, however) and the Ryobi came out on top from what I remember.
Make sure you price replacement batteries while you're at it. I remember that the CR article pointed out large price differences between brands.

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I did not read the article, but if CR says Ryobi is a good deal, but he DeWalt. I've had three batteries. The original stretched out to about 18 months before I got tired of recharging them after 20 minutes of use so I bought the Panasonic Drill.
Since the Ryobi was collecting dust and the battery price dropped to $25, I decided to try another. It still does not hold a charge for more than half the time of my Panasonic.
Ryobi may be OK for the twice a year handyguy at home, but under those circumstances, a corded drill is probably best anyway as it is not going to have a dead battery.
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On 12 Aug 2005 08:04:38 -0700, brewman snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I had a Ryobi once. It lasted about two years doing light-duty stuff before it died. I don't remember what went wrong, but I do remember being very disappointed in it. I haven't bought Ryobi since.
--
To email me directly, remove CLUTTER.


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For my money, little more than $199 ($237.49 minus $30 if you open an account with them) I get a Panasonic: (Amazon.com product link shortened)23876333/br=1-3/ref=br_lf_hi_3//103-6776578-4897461?v=glance&s=hi&nP6804
DeWalt is over rated in my opinion. I don't thank anyone makes a better drill than Panasonic but for thome use, not pro, you couldn't have a better price to performance ratio than the Ryobi. I have Panasonic drills for about 7 years, Ryobi drills for around 4 years and a B&D for 20 minutes before I put it in the trash bin.
I just pick up a Hitachi drill yesterday and looks like a winner. Couldn't comment too much since I haven't abused it yet on projects but it does look pretty good.
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(Amazon.com product link shortened)23876333/br=1-3/ref=br_lf_hi_3//103-6776578-4897461?v=glance&s=hi&nP6804
I bought a Hitachi for light duty sheet metal work, and the ONLY part thats left, is the light that came with the kit and the charger..total crap IMO... The Panasonics are incredible, but the OLDER Milwaukees are great...I am not sold on the new ones, since guess who bought them out? Ryobi.. Black and Decker makes the DeWalts....and the ones I have owned are ok...but not great.. Fav right now is a Bosch 18V that I cant kill....Ive used it for everything....smoked it one time and thought...NOW I know what it will take..but, its still running as good as new.
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About 6 or 7 years ago, my wife bought me a Craftsman drill for Xmas. This was a 14.5 Volt ("Wow!!! Four-Teen Point FIVE!!!!") I think she paid over a hundred dollars ON SALE for it at the time. Well, most Craftsman power stuff is crap, but I still have the drill. Use it almost every day. I've dropped it from a ladder a couple of times (bet you will nevr let me use YOUR tools, huh?) and it still keeps trudging along. Both batteries still good too.
I guy that just started working for us has an entire kit in what looks like a big duffle bag. Has a circular saw, saws-all, flashlight, angle drill, reg drill, etc. I think it is about 10 pieces. Can't remember the brand but since it was a black and yellow bag, I'd say it's a DeWalt. He got it at an estate auction for $100. Looks like it had never been used.
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Fred wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)23876333/br=1-3/ref=br_lf_hi_3//103-6776578-4897461?v=glance&s=hi&nP6804
Hi, Panasonic batteries are very expensive. I have De Walt DW929/DW920 kit. Around the house they do adequate job but if I need another drill I'd go for impact drill. For some brand replacement battery costs a LOT! Tony
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Look into a Panasonic 15.6 volt Compact, plenty of torque, and it will far outlast the Ryobi. I've had both and I'll never buy Ryobi again because of both battery failure and switch problems. . DeWalt is questionable.
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I've posted this a few years back and will now again; consider a Makita. My 9.6V is STILL going strong at 18 years old. I'm on my 3rd & 4th battery, of course, but the drill is still a joy to use. I had dropped it 2 stories onto a concrete floor when I had it only 2 months and nothing got broken!!! I was bought a DeWalt for work 5 years ago and within 3 months it smelled of burning electrics. It died shortly after and I now have a 12V makita. Now this Makita did have an issue with the clutch, which I repaired. Despite this, I would still consider another Makita.
2 other choices: Milwaulkee and Porter-Cable. Let's face it, if you buy a top quality tool, you should have it a LOOOONGGGG time.
Life's too short to use cheap tools!! ;-)
Thumper
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

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I have a 9V Makita. then I bought a 14V Dewalt . The 9V batteries just would ware out it seamed to fast. the Dewalt are suppose to take 1200 charges I lost count after 3. The Dewalt has allot of power the only thing I don't like the batteries are hard change you really have to push in the clips hard. The I used a Makita 12V on a job very solid just a nice drill. If I had used that before buying the Dewalt I would bought one. Another one to try is the Panasonic I no someone who swear by it. Maybe do a search and see witch have metal gears, I should of done that. But then another point there so expensive now you can buy a nice whole shooter and a 100" cord and go to dinner for the same price and the batteries don't go dead.
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brewman snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in

I'd go with the DeWalt before any Ryobi. First,does the Ryo have a fast charger,1 hr or less? The ones I've seen only had a simple charger that took 3 hrs or more,and can overcharge a pack if left on longer;there was no charge control.That is very important for battery life. Second,in Wood magazines tests on cordless drills,the DeWalts ALWAYS come out better than Ryobis. Third,I see lots of pro construction people with DeWalts,but no Ryobis.
Have you Googled for "cordless drill tests" to see what they have to say? There's a lot of them online.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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What kind of heavy duty jobs? Unless you are a construction worker, I doubt you'll need or want an 18V.
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Just around the house. That is what Ryobi is made for. The Dewalt is a step up. FWIW I make a living doing construction. I use my 18v dewalt tools everyday. Have not had a tool failure in 4 years. (Used 12volt ones for 4 years before that) They get left in the rain, fall off roofs, even dropped one in a swimming pool once. Batteries only last about 2 years though.
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brewman snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

May 2004 Consumer Reports evalated cordless drills, and among 18V models the DeWalt and Panasonic ranked highest, both receiving "A" grades for power and battery run time. The 18V Ryobi was "B" for power, "C" for battery life butd was still designated a "Best Buy". I know that the 18V DeWalt is noticeably more powerful than the 18V Ryobi, but the Ryobi costs so little (Home Depot charged $100 for my 18V with 2 battery packs and a flashlight) that it's a good alternative to a 14.4V DeWalt or Panasonic.
You may want to check the battery warranty, which can be different from the drill warranty, and the cost of replacements (some people don't buy Panasonics simply becase the batteries are so expensive) and availability of local service (local doesn't always mean good -- Ryobi's center for Phoenix is a lawnmower shop that doesn't even stock batteries, but DeWalt's is a complete repair center).
OTOH if you don't need a cordless drill (120VAC available, ot working in a damp environment), a corded drill is not only a lot more powerful but also cheaper and lighter. I think that a DeWalt 3/8" corded is just $60.
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I looked at a lot of the responses so far and I have to put my 2 cents in. I have a 14.4 volt Bosch. The great thing about the Bosch is the one hand chuck. When the drill if off, the internal shaft locks, so you use only one hand to loosen or tighten the chuck. My son has both an 18 volt and a 14.4 volt Bosch and he always goes after the Bosch. Yes, the 18 volt unit is much more powerful, but the one hand chuck convenience for most jobs is really great.
brewman snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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The day I bought my Panasonic, I set out to buy a Bosch. It was just bigger and heavier for my needs so I made the change. Bosch is top quality though. Most of the better drills today have the one hand chuck. VERY handy to have.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/




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