Constant-temperature dehumidification

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Without exposure to a person having a contagious virus or whatever, you can believe it, I am a loner, having been widowed and carrying the torch for 45 years.

I spend a summer in Las Vegas, 1 percent and 115 degrees was perfect for me.

I am not a doctor and I did not claim a cure, the suggested methods of prevention listed at the link you provided are almost identical to what I do, except my kids are fifty-ish and not in school.
Joe Fischer
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On Thu, 21 Sep 2006 12:34:15 -0400, Joe Fischer

No, I don't believe it, and neither would any logical person. Of course if you can deny the well-established cause of the common cold, then I suppose you won't have any trouble denying that you're illogical as well.

Being a widower hardly prevents human contact. All you need to do is put your hands on a grocery buggy for example and you can make contact with a virus.
Wayne
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Maybe you can tell us how many different bacterial and viral diseases go by the name "common cold".
If you premise were correct, if nobody got a cold all summer, then there would be no cold germs around.
I see you claim as requiring that the total reservoir of cold germs are in the nasal passages and airways of humans.
I have to think the germs are more widespread than that, and exist with or without humans.
The link you provided seems to say that colds are the result of the germs overwhelming the immune system, and that it is possible for a person to be exposed and still ward off the bad cold.
Are you claiming that a person gets a cold just because they come in contact with somebody with a cold, and never get a cold otherwise?
Joe Fischer
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On Thu, 21 Sep 2006 21:20:06 -0400, Joe Fischer

Why would I do that? Any web search you do will show that there are hundreds, but that none are called "dry nose" or whatever.

No, that doesn't follow at all. Being exposed to a virus doesn't mean you'll catch a cold. Yet it's both easy to come into contact with a virus, and difficult for the virus to take hold. You can dramatically increase the odds of avoiding affliction by using common sense, such as hand washing before putting your hands near your face after visiting a crowded store full of kiddies for example.

I'm getting that you see the facts however you like.

How would that help rationalize your belief that colds aren't always caused by "germs"?

Of course. And IIRC, if one has already been exposed to a particular virus, then one is unlikely to develop a cold from further exposure to the same virus.

I'm not claiming anything, just telling you the facts. You can't catch a cold without being exposed to a virus.
Wayne
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And the evidence for that last is that those who 'live' in isolated environments like lighthouses etc dont ever get colds regardless of what the room humidity is, because there are no viruses around.
Its less clear scientifically whether the room humidity has any effect on the infection rate when there are viruses around. Its unlikely in my opinion and the most likely reason why so many older people dont get colds anymore is likely just because they are immune to the vast bulk of cold seen, just because they have had so much more exposure to them than say kids ever get, just due to the vastly higher number of years of exposure to them and the fact that its been carefully established that there are so many strains extant.
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wrote:

An interesting study (can't remember where I read it), showed a strong correlation between elderly catching colds/flu and visits from grade-school children. Those visited by adults caught fewer colds than those visited by children. Presumably the children are great 'carriers' of the viruses/germs that cause colds/flu. (or colds aren't really caused by viruses, they are caused by children :-) )
daestrom

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On Sat, 23 Sep 2006 12:07:43 GMT, "daestrom"

Another study followed transmission (bacteria IIRC) between kindergartners in class. Summary - if a dab of peanut butter is put under a classroom chair leg, five minutes later every kid in the class will have some peanut butter on them. I think that anybody who's worked with roofing tar can relate. :-)
Wayne
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wrote:

Well of course colds are caused by virsuses (virii??). But if someone's natural defenses are weakened, doesn't that make them more susceptable to infection? If your sinuses are cracked and bleeding, isn't it more likely you will 'catch' one of those viruses floating around in a closed space?
The nasal passages are our first line of defense against such airborne infection. If some folks sinuses are particularly sensitive to drying, it seems quite logical that airborne infections have a better chance of taking hold in the body and causing illness.
From your article by the Mayo Clinic, on 'risk factors' : "Some researchers theorize that cold constricts blood vessels in the nose, slowing the white cells that fight infection and disrupting the first-line defense against germs. "
This supports the belief that your nose is the 'first-line defense against germs'. So doing something to keep from degrading its ability seems only natural.
daestrom
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On Thu, 21 Sep 2006 20:57:18 GMT, "daestrom"

Sure, but he's claiming that he can get a cold by (effectively) weakened defenses alone, as in, without a virus being present to defend against. That's pretty much the same as the old-wives tale about wet hair causing colds.
Wayne
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That argument can go on infinitum but since they are all only theories and nobody can actually prove them, there are many other "germ" theories out there, including the one Pasteur (inventor of our modern day "germ theory") went to his death bed with, that there is no "germ" outside the human body and they are all constantly within and brought forth by triggering substances.
I believe the culture dish and molds from nothing had something to do with the change in his lifelong theories.


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Mindless stuff, plenty have been very comprehensively proven.

Mindlessly silly, most obviously with culture dishes.

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Cites?

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Chase them up for yourself, start with cholera.
Dont need a cite for the obvious fact that culture dishes prove that the germs cultured clearly do grow outside the body, stupid.

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Your babble proves nothing. Either does your wishful thinking.
I know. You heard it from your mother that was told by a neighbour?

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Never ever could bullshit its way out of a wet paper bag.
So stupid that it cant even manage to work out that culture plates prove that germs grow outside the body either.

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No, but I may be less senile than you are :-)

With numbers. Bullshitting engineering VPs isn't easy. I started with the president/legal department and worked my way down.

Yawn.
Nick
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On 19 Sep 2006 14:57:58 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

Unfortunately you'll catch up.

Buildings today seem to be getting away from natural and passive systems and moving toward more complex active systems that require energy. My house has transoms, but they were painted shut when A/C became available and never used again.
In 1943 I was assistant manager of an 800 seat theater, and it had a passive warm weather ventilation system that I had no appreciation for at the time. The roof had a center section that was higher, and windows tilted in on both side walls of that high section. There were huge vent ducts which were not noticeable with floor grilles. With a large crowd, the heat generated per person increased the natural convection out those top windows, drawing air in the hidden floor ducts. On really hot days there were huge low speed fans in those ducts, but they rarely were needed.
If removing moisture with dehumidifiers for a family of four in a home in winter is an engineering problem in the classroom, then there a lot of homes that are apparently too moist, because there are few if any dehumidifiers used in homes other than in basements or laundry rooms.
There was a program on TV a few years ago that showed a southern home with the same type of natural ventilation as the theater I mentioned. And there has been some mention that some pyramids were constructed the same way.
Passive solar and natural convection ventilation systems seem to have been replaced by more positive systems that require energy, but that do provide more capacity at any time (as long as the grid is up).
Joe Fischer
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Perhaps you should unglue them. The post-occupation French word for "transom" is "Wasistdas."

Cool. Where did the air come from?
Nick
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On 20 Sep 2006 05:39:06 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

From large inverted J ducts on the roof, like those seen on ships.
Everything was so automatic, needing very little attention, even though I was the only person besides the cashier and projectionists there, nothing required my intervention except opening the top windows seasonally and tapping on the air traps on the low pressure steam radiators to get steam to them occasionally in heating season.
A freeway took the site in 1962.
Joe Fischer
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I doubt the cool air came from ducts on the roof without powered ventilation.
wrote:

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