Connecting an Alternator to horse drawn buggy

Page 2 of 3  
Tony Hwang wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 08 Nov 2007 02:16:53 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@notmail.com

Use lanterns. If you're going to live in the bronze age, then electric lighting isn't available.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Remember those bicycle lights that have a generator that rubs on the tire to light the light? They might be AC output, so you'd need some diodes to charge batteries, but they could be a good starting point. Add a "tire" to the generator if the buggy wheels are not rubber. Obviously, the output current is limited, so you either need small bulbs or multiple generators.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It looks like LED lights and solar panels WIN in this thread, and I can surely relate to both as a good alternative. Solar panels are cheap to run too, once they are paid for. I wish they made some bicycle generators that were a higher output. I think those common ones are just 1.5 volts (or less). Too bad they dont make a 12V model (or do they?).
Anyone know of any sources on the web for higher output 12v bicycle type generators? What is a good source for both solar panels and bright headlight type LED lights?
One thing mentioned were lanterns. I ma not sure just why they dont use them on their buggies. Maybe they do not meet the requirements of the law. or maybe it's the fire hazzard, or just the cost of kerosene? I will have to ask. I do see them sold on websites that sell parts for horsedrawn buggies and wagons, but it seems they are more decoration that useful.....
Thanks for all the advice.
Alvin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 08 Nov 2007 23:18:38 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@notmail.com wrote:

LED lights and solar panels are used extensively on sailboats. You could try the big chains such as West Marine and Defender.com, or save a lot of money by trying Ebay or just doing some google searches.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's been many years since I checked, but it seems to me the generator on the tire thing I had was more like 6V.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I just dug one out of a box. With a DVM connected to it, no load, sweeping my arm across the ground (3-6 ft/sec?), I got 3 VDC. So 6 VDC at speed might be right. I would expect that since it produced DC, you could wire more than one in series for higher voltage. For that matter, get a good (lower speed) DC motor, put a small "tire" on the shaft, and see how that works. I would expect that the higher the voltage motor it is, the higher voltage you'd get out. A low speed motor would probably produce more voltage at buggy speeds than a 18000 rpm motor. This would cost way less than solar panels.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 08 Nov 2007 02:16:53 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@notmail.com wrote:

One page PDF file for Amish Buggy LED lights - lumileds.com.
http://www.lumileds.com/pdfs/AmishBuggy0903F.PDF
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
if they're going to bend the rules enough to put an alternator on the buggy, THEY'd be better off buying some suitably sized solar panels to charge those batteries during the day when not in use. I'm afraid by the time you geared the alternator up with pulleys or gears, you'd have quite the drag on that wheel. A typical GM self exciting alternator needs to spin about 2000 rpm to get anything useful done.
steve

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ineresting! What comes t my mind is the old bicycle lights. You know, the ones that run off the spokes hitting the wheels? They generaly stop when you stop, but might that be somesort of lead? I've seen ones for sale that charge a small accessory battery so it runs for a bit when stopped.
I'e also seen solar powered bicycle lights, charge during the day stuff. I didnt have much luck with the one I got, but then I only had a west/south facing window to charge it in ad seldom got 'direct sun'. They don't give alot of light, but several of them might do the trick as well as fit the lifestye?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It seems like LED and a solarpanel is a great solution,and in these days when environmental problems is discussed worldwide,it would definitely be a positive solution for that too. No emissions and also it will not need much maintenance so it would be a great solution. Solarpanels has also been improved and still are,next generation solarpanels will be much more efficient then todays. What I've heard they work really fine. Regards

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I would be looking to use LED style lights instead and a bicycle generator with maybe a solar panel too. I also think that using automotive stuff would weight too much and have too much drag. Most modern alternators create way too much current for just lights anyway. Even an older 40A alternator wouldn't be as good as say going to Nashbar's or Performance's website and using bicycle stuff instead. Maybe if these Amish had electrical rear defoggers that they were using then you might be able to justify something like an automotive alternator.
To the person who said something about why are they even using electricity in the first place, they aren't always necessarily against it. It's more of a self sufficiency type of thing (meaning that in some Amish communities it's OK to use electricity for certain things as long as you generate it yourself).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 08 Nov 2007 10:34:13 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Check out this buggy with amber flashers on front and rear. * Buggy battery safety is important :)
* Ohio State University Fact Sheet Buggy Lighting and Marking Recommendations http://ohioline.osu.edu/aex-fact/0596_4.html
The following fact sheets are available from Ohio State University Extension:
Driving Safely in Amish Country, AEX 596 Buying the Right Battery for Your Buggy, AEX 596.1 Buggy Battery Safety, AEX 596.2 Buggy Highway Safety Tips for You and Your Family, AEX 596.3 Buggy Lighting and Marking Recommendations, AEX 596.4 Pedestrian Safety in Amish Country,AEX 596.5 Bicycle Safety in Amish Country,AEX 596.6 Boosting Visibility of Ag Equipment, AEX 598 Additional Marking of Horse Drawn Vehicles = Additional Safety, AEX 598.1 http://www.ag.ohio-state.edu/~agsafety/ash/programs/am_pubs.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 08 Nov 2007 10:34:13 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Check out this buggy with amber flashers on front and rear. * Buggy battery safety is important :)
* Ohio State University Fact Sheet Buggy Lighting and Marking Recommendations http://ohioline.osu.edu/aex-fact/0596_4.html
The following fact sheets are available from Ohio State University Extension:
Driving Safely in Amish Country, AEX 596 Buying the Right Battery for Your Buggy, AEX 596.1 Buggy Battery Safety, AEX 596.2 Buggy Highway Safety Tips for You and Your Family, AEX 596.3 Buggy Lighting and Marking Recommendations, AEX 596.4 Pedestrian Safety in Amish Country,AEX 596.5 Bicycle Safety in Amish Country,AEX 596.6 Boosting Visibility of Ag Equipment, AEX 598 Additional Marking of Horse Drawn Vehicles = Additional Safety, AEX 598.1 http://www.ag.ohio-state.edu/~agsafety/ash/programs/am_pubs.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 08 Nov 2007 10:34:13 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Check out this buggy with amber flashers on front and rear. * Buggy battery safety is important :)
* Ohio State University Fact Sheet Buggy Lighting and Marking Recommendations http://ohioline.osu.edu/aex-fact/0596_4.html
The following fact sheets are available from Ohio State University Extension:
Driving Safely in Amish Country, AEX 596 Buying the Right Battery for Your Buggy, AEX 596.1 Buggy Battery Safety, AEX 596.2 Buggy Highway Safety Tips for You and Your Family, AEX 596.3 Buggy Lighting and Marking Recommendations, AEX 596.4 Pedestrian Safety in Amish Country,AEX 596.5 Bicycle Safety in Amish Country,AEX 596.6 Boosting Visibility of Ag Equipment, AEX 598 Additional Marking of Horse Drawn Vehicles = Additional Safety, AEX 598.1 http://www.ag.ohio-state.edu/~agsafety/ash/programs/am_pubs.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Actually the solar panels are probably only a reasonable idea if they park the buggy outside, I would think.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Given how long their trips take, and mostly during the day at that where lighting isn't necessary, it's probably not an issue.
Someone would have to do some simple calculations with specs on candidate components to figure out how much daylight they'd need.
Can't be too impractical, otherwise, solar lights wouldn't work - usually capable of 8 hours or so using only a square inch or two of collector and a single AA battery. Scale it up to a 4x4 or larger collector, and reasonably well chosen LED lights, I'm sure it'd work quite well. Except after long period of truly abysmal weather.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I repair office machines. a guy kept calling and missing me. but said I have no phone.
found out later he was amish looking for parts for a old hand crank ditto machine, that I used to service.
sadly he quit calling, he was ill in hospital I think he died.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 08 Nov 2007 19:32:37 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

Actually, their Sunday church services begin around sunrise and they generally do not come home until 9 or 10 pm. It's more than "church". They have a meal or two, the youngers ones play games later in the day, the older ones socialize and discuss their business and horses. They can not do any work on Sundays except to care for their horses and other animals. They work most of the time the other 6 days of the week, so Sunday is their day to relax. My point is that they often come home from their Sunday worship after dark, particularly when the days are shorter. Some travel 10 to 15 miles each way. Those horses do work hard at times.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Re Re: Connecting an Alternator to horse drawn buggy:

This (or similar) charger
http://www.batteryspace.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID 52
with LED lights should be cheaper and easier than any generator.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.