Concrete Patio


Hi all,
I have a 16' x 22' concrete patio that butts up against the utilityroom exterior wall foundation. It was poured when the house was built almost 40 yrs ago.
It has severe cracks that appear to be almost, if not, all the way through . Some not so deep. The cracks have created individual sections, which has caused an uneven surface.
What can I use to seal the cracks? Finished appearance is not an issue since I intend to build a "floating" deck over it.
I want to seal them so as to eliminate any further "settling" due to the water undermining the slab(s).
Any and all experience and expertise is appreciated. :)
Vv
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Will the area be roofed over when the new floor is built, and/or will water still be able to get under the slab(?) from around the perimeter, and then be subject to freezing and thawing?
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wrote:

Bob, no roof or cover over the deck, but once I can get the cracks sealed I intend on covering the entire slab with roll roofing, sort of like tarpaper on a roof.
Thanks for the good response.
Vv
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wrote:

Will the area be roofed over when the new floor is built, and/or will water still be able to get under the slab(?) from around the perimeter, and then be subject to freezing and thawing?
I had good luck with pourcrete. Hydraulic cement. Has the consistency of flour, you make it up until it is like thin pancake batter and pour in a hurry, cause it sets fast. I had a bottom concrete slab at my cabin that had sluffed off heavily due to freeze/thaw cycles, and just the aggregate was showing. It would get wet, then freeze, then be slippery. I put some PourStone on there, and made it intentionally rough on top, thinking I'd just get the season out of it, and that would be it. It still has a grip on the original concrete going on three years now, and is not sluffing at all with the freeze thaw cycles. Be careful to mix it in small batches, like a pint or less, because it is spendy, and you will waste it if you make too much, and it starts setting. I like to use it on cracks because you make it to the consistency of being pourable, and just pour it in the cracks, and it flows right in. If one settles too much, just add a little more the next time. It's weird stuff when you are mixing it like corn starch, it all settles to the bottom. I use a wood paint stirrer to mix it.
HTH
Steve
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There are thing you can do to slippery wet tiles to treat them to make them anti-slip or non-slip solutions. The best one around is http://www.slipdoctors.com They should have a solution that works on slick concrete surfaces especially slipery when wet and unsafe. Give them a call and see if they have some non-slip solutions.
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Virtual Voyager wrote:

concrete out, correct the drainage problems that led to the settling (or more likely frost heaving, if you live in frost country), and cover the area with landscape fabric and gravel after you put in proper piers to hold up the deck. I have a slightly-heaved buried patio under my deck, and debris and such builds up under there, and causes ponding against the imperfectly sealed foundation, and the water ends up in the basement. The water may not be only coming through the cracks- it is quite likely also coming in under the edge of the slab, if your yard has any slope at all to it. The natural tendency of turf to 'eat' concrete slabs can make even a level patio subject to ponding. Your yard does get taller over the years. Pond under deck leads to mosquitoes, even if your basement waterproofing keeps the basement perfectly dry. No sunlight, that water can takes days to evaporate.
-- aem sends..
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As long as the slab grade allows water to run off in the proper fashion and it is stable, I see no need to tear the existing concrete out. That is major work and the disposal of the concrete can be costly.
Just caulk the cracks with one of the concrete crack repair products available in a caulk gun type tube. However if the new deck is going to depend on the old concrete, you do need to be certain that it is stable at this point.
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thanks for the advice and info, I appreciate everyone's help.
Vv
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