Compresson fitting question

I am replacing the shut-off valve under my sink. A compression fitting connects the valve to the 1/2 inch copper line.
How do I get the old compression ring and old compression nut off the copper line? Is there a special tool for it? Or, can I just re-use the old compression ring?
Thanks
Walter The Happy Iconoclast www.rationality.net
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Walter R. wrote:

fitting
copper
The compression ring crushes into the line when applied properly, making it nearly impossible to get the ring off without damaging the line. Otherwise your compression fitting would leak between the line and ring. Even if you do manage to get the old ring off, if you put a new ring in the spot where the old one was, it still may not seal well. You really have two options, use the old ring and nut if in good shape and see if they leak (this has worked for me on a number of occasions). Alternately you can cut the line just underneath the ring and use a new nut and ring.
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I've had mixed luck with re-using the fittings (ring and nut). Easiest way is to use a tubing cutter and cut it off. Cheers, cc

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Most of the time its ok to reuse. There is a special two part tool to remove the compression nut/ring - a puller and a corresponding plug that goes into either 1/2" or 3/4" line.
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Walter R. wrote:

If the line is too short to accept cutting off the end and using a new ring (ferrule) Then just reuse the old one. If you get a tiny leak, resist the temptation to wrench it tighter, you may strip or bust something. Just back the nut off and try sealing between the ferrule/tubing and the shutoff valve port one of these ways.
1. Lift the tubing out of the valve and smear a little pipe dope all around the ferrule and the part of the tubing which goes into the valve port. Then sock the nut down again.
2. Same thing, but make a piece of Teflon "string" by twisting a length of Teflon pipe tape and wind 1-1/2 turns of it around the tubing so that it will get crunched between the ferrule and the shutoff valve port when you tighten the nut again.
Both techniques have worked for me every time I've used them.
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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I usually use the blade of a metal hacksaw, and cut a small groove on the ring. In order to not damage the pipe, I cut down enough to not touch the pipe, and then use a flat head screwdriver, and insert in the cut and twist. At that point the brass is soft and thin, that it usually just snaps off. Then use some emery cloth (or sand paper), and clean the pipe well to assure no minor deformaties.
Also when doing it, and in a super rush, I've occasionally just wrapped some teflon tape around the old ring, and reused it. Haven't had any problems with it either. I prefer removing them since it only takes a minute or two...
Good Luck

copper
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I've had good results using the old nut and ring. Be sure to oil the threads, so it slides together easier.
--

Christopher A. Young
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A dremel with a small cut-off blade would work better than a hacksaw.
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WHY are you replacing the valve? If it leaks, replace the washer/packing.
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a
Well, I just pick up a $99 "Washer Selection" from Big Lots. Obviously, you can't use a washer that's too small. BUT a washer that's slightly too big can be "cut down." You can use anything from a sharp razor blade to a belt sander.
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Sometimes that's easier said than done. Two weeks ago, I needed to repair a leaking hose bibb that didn't need anything more than a new cone washer. Took the old one to *three* different home centers, and found *nothing* to match. Finally decided that spending five bucks to buy a new valve was a better use of my time and money than driving all over town trying to find a washer.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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Yeowch! At that price, I could replace every hose bibb in my house and still be waaay ahead.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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