Compact Refrigerator

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It has provided 27 yrs. of excellent service but finally just stopped running. Wiggle the pronged plug in the wall and it starts running ... but then dies again. It's apparently not a house problem because the radio works in the same wall socket. Any ideas? Thanks.
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Way Back Jack wrote:

Bad cord.
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dadiOH
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wrote:

Cord or plug. I'd cut the last inch off and put a new plug on the end.
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Unplug it before you cut the cord.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Spoilsport :)
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dadiOH
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Replace the receptacle as well. Plugs fail, but when they do 99.99% of the time the receptacle is the root cause of the problem. Do not replace with a <$1 POS receptacle, get a "spec" / commercial grade receptacle for $5 or so.
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On Sat, 07 Jul 2012 14:07:55 -0500, Pete C. wrote:

Do you have an idea of what an electrician would charge to repair the plug & replace the receptacle? Thanks
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On Sat, 07 Jul 2012 15:24:58 -0700, SMS wrote:

OK, thanks. I gan get a compact fridge of comparable size for about $300.
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If the socket is the problem, you'll be out three c'notes, and still won't have cold food.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

OK, thanks. I gan get a compact fridge of comparable size for about $300.
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Way Back Jack wrote:

You can get a new appliance plug less than $5.
1. cut off old plug
2. strip off a couple of inches of insulation
3. cut off about an inch of insulation on each of three wires.
4. attach each of the three wires to the screws in the new plug. Put them clockwise around the screws, tighten the screws. Put white wire on the silver screw, black wire on the gold, green on the green.
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Way Back Jack wrote:

I agree with the others that it may be a bad plug and cord or it may be a bad outlet, or a combination of both. You do as someone suggested and try plugging the fridge into another outlet and then wiggle the plug and cord and see if the same thing happens. If you can't easily move the fridge closer to another outlet, you could try using an extension cord, but then you would need to wiggle the plug where it plugs into the extension cord. It also could just be a bad outlet that the plug on the radio happens to fit into okay but the plug from the fridge does not.
You don't need to hire an electrician to replace the outlet and/or the cord -- you could just hire a handyman-type person for a lot less. If you explain that you just want the person to switch out the outlet and maybe replace the plug on the end of the cord, you can probably find someone locally who will do it for something like $25 plus parts -- maybe $35 for the whole job. That is if you hire someone who works for himself/herself and is not one of those handyman franchises. The handyman franchises tend to charge something like $65/hour plug parts.
Most people do these types of repairs themselves, but not everyone wants, or knows how to, or even wants to learn how to do it.
I went to http://YouTube.com and tried to find some good videos on how to change the plug on the end of an electrical cord, but I didn't see any right away. But, I did see these two (and others) on how to change an electrical outlet:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vfZAE1VQPEY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v
aGPD2nAM0
You may be one of those people who wouldn't want to do this on their own even after watching a how-to video etc. But, if you watch the video you'll see how quick and easy the job is, and you'll see that you can just tell a handyman-type person what you want done and how easily that person can do that for you. If I lived near you, I would do it for you for free since it is so easy. But a local person won't charge much at all.
One other note: Depending on how the cord is connected to your fridge, it may be possible to buy a whole replacement cord with the plug already on the end and replace the whole cord yourself. You would have to look at the fridge and maybe (after unplugging it) unscrew a cover plate where the cord goes into the fridge and see how the cord connects to the fridge. If it is easily accessible, you could take off the cord there, bring it to a Home Depot, Lowes, etc. and buy a replacement cord and plug and replace it yourself. But, first do the idea of trying to plug the fridge in another outlet in case it is the outlet that is bad and not the cord or plug.
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On Sun, 8 Jul 2012 10:26:27 -0400, TomR wrote:

Thanks for responding. Hanging around here, I may actually learn something.
Anyway, I tried another outlet and it worked great --- for about 4 hours -- and then died.
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It would be bad to wiggle cord while plugged in. I would use an ohmmeter. It's usually at the plug but could be up a ways up. After replacing, make sure you have ground continuity between plug and chassis.
Greg
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wrote:

While technically correct, your instructions are useless for the OP. He does not know how to change the plug so I doubt he has a muliti-meter and knows about continuity.
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On Sun, 08 Jul 2012 22:34:03 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

The fact that it runs for several hrs. before conking out makes me wonder if the problem lies with the motor rather than the plug or cord.
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wrote:

If it goes several hours and stop, perhaps it is something else. If jiggling the cord affects it, then the plug is a likely culprit.
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wrote:

I don't think it is the receptacle as other items work in it. The plug is a DIY job if you take your time and look for instructions. An electrician is going to charge from $50 to $100 just to walk through the door.
Ask a neighbor for help if you need it.
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Before I'd concern myself with the receptacle since other plugs work in it, I'd try the fridge in another receptacle.
Replacing the plug is usually no more than cutting the old one off and attaching the wires to the screws of the replacement one. 2 screws if there is no ground, 3 if there is. Then it's just a matter of closing up the new plug with the screws provided. When you buy the replacement plug, just make sure you buy a packaged one that comes with instructions.
The only other thing is to make sure you connect the hot to the hot prong and the neutral to the neutral. If the existing plug has one wide prong, that's the neutral. Check the wire on that side (it might be rough, while the other is smooth) to note which is the neutral. That's assuming it's a molded plug. If it's not, just open it up and note where each wire goes.
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Or get a knowledgeable neighbor and watch him/her closely so you can do it the next time, In our household, the kids at age 10 could do what you are needing to do.
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Hour's labor and the cost of the parts, most likely.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Do you have an idea of what an electrician would charge to repair the plug & replace the receptacle? Thanks
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