Compact Florescent lamp trick

Page 2 of 3  

Nate Nagel wrote:

We had to leave the tinkering in the garage, or in my bedroom. I did however picture pulling the light down while doing some big jigsaw puzzles.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat 17 Oct 2009 02:46:05p, Nate Nagel told us...

who
old.

When I was growing up in the 1950s-1960s, we had both types of the pole lamps, the spring-tensioned style and the style with a base. We never had a pull down ceiling light, but I remember them well. There are contemporary versions still made, but the styling has been updated.
We also had a "TV lamp" that sat on top of the television and reflected light upward and backward. Back then it was considered bad for the eyes to view a televisioin in a totally darkened room, and ambient light somewhere around the TV was considered ideal.
--

~~ If there\'s a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wayne Boatwright wrote: (snip)

Chuckle. There was a recent thread, forget which group, bitching about a brand of wall-mount flat TV that had lighting like that built into the edge of the 'picture frame' on the set, with a photo cell to measure the room light. As room got dark, it would switch itself on.
Don't know if it is actually bad for the eyes or not, but it does probably reduce bumped shins when you get up to run to the can during commercials. I usually just leave the light at the far end of the kitchen turned on.
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:
[snip]

And the light makes it harder to accidentally step on a cat. They're something like the other things you can bump into, but are mobile and can be found in unexpected places.
I keep a string of green LED holiday lights on all the time.
BTW, some of the lights (some in each series) have gone out over time, but others are still lit. That's strange.
--
68 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun 18 Oct 2009 11:01:34a, Mark Lloyd told us...

Actually, not at all strange. Typically these lights are wired in series, but the bulbs are designed to fuse the filament together when they burn out so that the circuit is still completed.
--

~~ If there\'s a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 19 Oct 2009 00:39:48 GMT, Wayne Boatwright

LEDs don't have filaments, but semiconductor junctions.
--
67 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon 19 Oct 2009 06:32:25a, Mark Lloyd told us...

wrote:
series,

out
Yup, I missed that on first reading. However, there must be something in the circuit that insures continuity when the led fails.
--

~~ If there\'s a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

I don't have one to look at, but there is a good chance they are all wired parallel and each LED has a resistor built in or added.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It the LEDs are in parallel on 120V, it'd take a big series resistor and efficiency would be low.
The current consumption of this 70-LED string is about 15mA (.015A). Since that sounds like the current for one LED, that suggests series.
BTW, I've verified that 35 work on each polarity (testing a new string).
--
65 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tony wrote:

Was the one your family had antique brass or copper colored? There may have been others, but those stick in my mind. My family's 1956 house had one of those in copper, to go with the Real Wood cherry cabinets, but the 1966 house had a very futuristic flying saucer lamp on a brush-nickel colored down pipe. The real dining table used 90% of the time, a table-height peninsula in the kitchen, had focused cans above it.
That 1966 house was great, my old man's big dream for his family. Too bad we couldn't afford it (68-70 being real bad years for custom builders), and ended up elsewhere by 72. If I was to hit the lotto, I believe I would knock on the door and make the current owners an offer for it. I drive by once a year or so, when I happen to be in that town. They have changed a few things, but they haven't mucked it up too bad, other than a hideous front door. I wonder if my key still fits the door? Probably best that I'll never know, I guess. Reality can never live up to memories.
-- aem sends....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
aemeijers wrote:

In the pull down light I picture the egg,spring,cord holder as bright brass plated with spots where the clear finish didn't hold up. The light itself was sort of like a flying saucer metal on top and I think frosted glass on the bottom, and I think instead of the normal screw on part to hold the glass, it was made so you could grab it with your finger to pull it down. The top part had a design made with little holes in the metal that let a small amount of light out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

standard light bulb that we all know and love, "Mogul base" is the size larger than that that you hardly ever see anymore.
nate
I know the Edison base as a "medium base". (No slight meant to Edison) And you still see Mogal base on Mercury vapor exterior lighting.
bob_v
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob Villa wrote:

And if you can find those giant 200 or 300 watt incandescent bulbs they have the the large base.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I have seen a 200W bulb in about 1978. It had a standard base. About the same time I found a 1000W bulb, which did have a mogul base. I gave off a lot of heat too.
--
69 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My experience in USA is that 200 and 300 watt 120V single-filament incandescents and 50-200-250 watt 3-way ones tend to have medium bases.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don Klipstein wrote:

I could easily be wrong about the 200 300 watt bases. I'm going from memory from ~1979 and I have a hard time remembering today! I was probably just stunned at the size of the bulb itself. I'm sure it was at least 10" from base to top. Or maybe the wattage was higher than I remember?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah, they are ugly. I saw them in HD the other day. Wife says that for as little as we use ours we can stick with incandescent.
Jimmie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-snip-

-snip-
Don't CFL those-- use LEDs- (Amazon.com product link shortened)
You can spend upwards of $20 on a bulb, but it should out-perform and outlast a couple CFLs.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For lamps bright enough for general illumination, such as 40 watt incandescent equivalent, I am finding most LED ones to be low on light output and to often have an icy cold color.
This will improve over the next several years.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 19 Oct 2009 22:55:19 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

Or possibly, not. Apparently there's a problem called "droop" when they try to increase the intensity of LEDs - efficiency drops - and it's already not quite as good as CFLs on the newer 1 watt and larger LEDs. Color ... maybe. Price ... maybe a little. But it seems the technology is currently stuck.
I just got a couple of the 23 watt and 40 watt candelabra base CFLs, put in one 40 watt - and it was almost too bright, compared to the incandescent it replaced. That's in a fixture. Haven't put them yet into the chandelier, we'll see how that goes esthetically. Fortunately we already removed the dimmer!
J.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.