Code Question

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I'm not 100% sure, but the "all counter outlets must be GFCI'd" rule the NEC now enforces probably overrides the dedicated/non-120V rule. Especially if it's close to the sink.
Unless you can get an inspector to rule otherwise, I'd assume all US countertop outlets must be GFCI'd, no matter what they are.
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Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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No. Only 125 volt outlets.
210-8. Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for Personnel
(a) Dwelling Units. All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed in the locations specified below shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel.
I didn't copy the rest, but it applies only to 125 volt receptacles.
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Thanks for that.
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I installed a 100a, 3 phase receptacle in a theater for portable dimmerpacks. They have plugs you almost need 2 people to carry. Just once, before I retire, I'd like to hang that puppy over a kitchen sink, or next to a swimming pool, just to snap a picture of the inspector's face.
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snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

The electric frying pan went out of favor with the introduction of the slow cooker.
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Like I said, Americans don't "do" electric kettles, most of them haven't a clue what an electric kettle _is_ ;-)
It ain't a frying pan... ;-)
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Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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Chris Lewis wrote:

If I did somehow get a 2400W (or larger) electric kettle from UK, would I be able to get a NEMA 6-15 or NEMA 6-20 cord for it so I could plug it into a 220V US outlet? Or would I need to find a British style outlet? Or just replace the end of the British cord with a US plug?
Best regards, Bob
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Just replace the plug on the cord.
Preassembled appliance cords with something other than standard 15/20A 120V plugs on the end are pretty rare here. Unless it's 240V/30A (dryer) or 240V/50A (stove cord). A 240V/50A kettle would be quite the thing ;-)
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True, but we also don't "do" tea. So let's not go there...
And you can't rush a coffeepot.

That, in inspector-ese, would be like mixing matter and anti-matter.

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in article c0e889$16c284$ snipped-for-privacy@ID-63726.news.uni-berlin.de, zxcvbob at snipped-for-privacy@charter.net wrote on 2/11/04 4:53 PM:

Are you sure you want to do that? The power supply differences between US and Europe are not only on voltage, they also use different frequencies. I don't think I would use a European appliance in my home without a transformer. But that's just me. Cheers, Stephan.
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Stephan Bour wrote:

It won't make any difference at all for a resistive load. And a transformer doesn't change the freq anyway.
Thanks, Bob
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Right. The frequency difference usually only matters to inductive motors and (probably higher power) transformers.
These days, most equipment is quite frequency insensitive.
A resistive load could care less what the frequency was (within reason, 400Ghz need not apply ;-). Even DC is fine for pure resistive loads.
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Chris Lewis ( snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com) said...

Code update!
As of the 2002 revision of the code (OESC - the Ontario Electrical Safety Code, the Ontario-ized version of the CEC), as an alternative to the split outlets, a 20A non-split outlet with a T-slot configuration (to accept either a 15A or a 20A plug) can be used in kitchens here in Canada.
The same release of the OESC makes it manditory since January 1, 2003 to have all kitchen outlets within 1 metre of a sink to be GFCI protected. Since they do not make split GFCI outlets and 2-pole GFCI breakers can be pricey, you will now see 20A T-slot GFCI outlets near sinks in Canadian kitchens.
I have three such outlets in the kitchen of the house we just built. We have two outlets that are not so close to the sinks so they are 15A split.
We had to add another outlet on a small stretch of counter that the inspector said needed its own outlet, so rather than run another 14/3 line and use two more breaker positions, we just ran a 12/2 line to the nearest 20A circuit since it was one outlet on its own circuit and you are allowed up to two on the same circuit in kitchens (with an exception for wheel-chair accessible outlets).
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I believe you can do it with one pair of outlets, by removing the ear on one side so the top and bottom are on different phase.
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on
I agree. We have several kitchen outlets wired that way; by removing the ear between the upper an lower 'live' side of the duplex outlet and wiring with three wire (plus ground). Conventional, in this part of Canada anyway; ground is bare copper, white is neutral, black is one of the 115 volts 'legs' and red the other 115 volt 'leg'. A double pole circuit breaker is used at the panel to protect/disconnect both legs simultaneously. It may be wise to adopt a convention for all such outlets wired that way such as "Red wire to the top of the outlet, black to the bottom, etc." It basically doubles the capacity of that outlet (or run of outlets) for a very slight additional cost of wire. And we can argue about the extra cost of a double pole breaker versus another run of outlets? I've never seen, other than a single phase 115-0-115 supply, in North America, to a single family residence etc.? It's basically a centre tapped single phase from the distribution transformer. This provides 230 volts, single phase between the two 115 volt legs for heavier appliances. So the terminology 'leg' rather than the sometimes used 'phase', would be much more correct IMHO. Terry.
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Might be a good idea to place a note in your breaker panel saying the tie bar'ed breaker is for that outlet and that it is not for a 240V circuit.
This is good if you sell your house, etc. Then the next person know what's going on...
"jmagerl" wrote in message

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A tied breaker should be enough, it isn't even required by code, but is a very, very, good idea that all power in an outlet box get shut off at one time, since most humans expect that to happen.
Inside the breaker box, wrap a piece of the same (different than the wires) color on the wires that make the edison circuit, so that they are identified as a pair. For example, the black and red wires with the blue tape on them are a paired circuit.
By simply changing from a 115v to 220v outlet, a future owner could have a 220 outlet.
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The NEC is a quite confusing here, but, you should assume that a tied breaker _is_ required for a split-phase duplex receptacle on a common neutral circuit or even if you're doing your duplex receptacle with two independent neutrals. If you had _two_ duplex receptacles with independent neutrals in a box, then you probably don't need a tied breaker. But I think that's dumb.
The CEC is more anal, and insists that all circuits feeding a box (short of metal separators yadda yadda yadda) get disconnected at the same time, common neutral or not. So there's absolutely no question here.
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It IS code that when 2 circuits feed a device on a single strap, a tied breaker is used. SO in this example of an edison circuit feeding the upper and lower 1/2's of a duplex receptacle, code would require that both breakers open simultaniously.
IF however, the edison circuit split at the 1st box, feeding 2 seperate circuits where a bunch of duplexes were on one circuit, and a different bunch on another, and at no point (especially the 1st outlet) were the 2 circuits on the same device, then the breakers need not open simultaniously.
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