Check connetions and dust first

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On Wednesday, April 29, 2015 at 3:22:55 AM UTC-5, bubba wrote:

I've heard of folks who also believe they can hose their appliances in the tub! Mr. Burns, evidently works in design or on customers' goods...therefore, extreme caution is necessary. I use similar cautions...but on a hobby basis.
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On 4/29/15 4:22 AM, bubba wrote:

I'm with you. We used to fix buggy equipment by letting it soak in a deep sink with hot water and floor soap. Then rinse. Then bake at 125F for 24 hours.
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On 4/29/2015 3:13 PM, J Burns wrote:

We used to scrub it on a wash board. And then dry it in the hickory smokehose.
However, for computers, the air compressor sounds right. Be sure to use modulated air.
--
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Christopher A. Young
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Make sure you use dry air. Probably also want a trap to prevent any oil from the compressor (or any inline oilers) from coating the electronics.
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On 4/30/15 9:44 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

PSI at ambient temperature and 100% RH, the air coming out will have 15% RH at the same temperature. I used to have to bleed off the water that ended up in the bottom of the tank.
Blowing a paper taped to a wall would be a way to check for oil.
Hitting a fan with compressed air can ruin it or cause it to ruin something else by generating electricity. I've read that compressed air can cause dust to lodge where it will do more harm than before.
I want to support higher education. I'll hire a dozen coeds and issue them attractive uniforms and drinking straws. They'll go door to door, offering to blow out computers gently. If their voice modulation doesn't sell the customer, the sight and aroma of their fishnet hickory smokehose will.
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Per J Burns:

When I serviced crypto equipment in Hawaii, we used to scrub the circuit boards in a warm solution of Pine-Sol.... scrub brush and all...
--
Pete Cresswell

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On 4/30/15 9:35 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Anything from Alaska's 6640 miles of coastline that couldn't be fixed in the field came to us. The AN/URC-51 (UHF/SSB) was the eqjuipment we always laundered. I didn't understand it, but it helped a lot. Now I think the grime caused stray capacitance.
We used a caustic powdered floor soap that would probably have left a film if not thoroughly rinsed.
In the early 1980s, my mother's 19" TV quit. The main board was covered with syrup. Somebody must have put a sugary drink on the TV and knocked it over. I knew she wouldn't tell, so I didn't ask. I just soaked the TV in the laundry sink. I added a little ammonia. It was potentially harmful, but it wouldn't leave a deposit.
The TV worked like new after that.
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On 4/30/15 2:48 PM, J Burns wrote:

Did I say 6640 miles? That's according to the the 1975 CRS report for Congress. The NOAA says Alaska has 33,904 miles of coastline.
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Over here it says 49,000 miles:
http://www.adn.com/article/20150220/getting-close-and-personal-alaskas-coastline
They point out the obvious, the closer you look, the longer the coast gets. Measure around each pebble and it gets really long.
--
Dan Espen

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J Burns wrote:

Of course, you could/can do that with discrete/legacy components, but not any more these days. Maybe we can wash keyboard in the DW, well, I suppose I can wash guitar amp. PCb board as well. Most today's guitar amp. based on vacuum tubes have PCBs. Not much P-P wiring any more unless it is boutique class high end stuff.
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On 4/30/15 3:51 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

The circuitry of that TV was mostly ICs with lots of legs. Water under an IC can take a long time to dry. Sometimes I use a little rubbing alcohol to help get the water out by lowering surface tension.
What can't be washed these days? I wash keyboards in the kitchen sink. I wouldn't want to get a relay wet.
This guy says he restored his Kindle by washing the circuitry with a Waterpik flosser.
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On Thursday, April 30, 2015 at 4:34:35 PM UTC-5, J Burns wrote:

When I worked in a repair shop (on PC boards for cash registers) we steam cleaned boards and dried them with compressed air. These were Cmos and Pmos design (Rockwell CPU's). I never had a problem with a board...and knew of no one else that had...
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Tony Hwang wrote:

Is there anything you were taught years ago that would be considered utter nonsense now? Maybe something thought impossible then but routine now?
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Tony Hwang wrote:

It's really great that you are posting here, my friend! I took a few electronics classes in college in the early 70's as free electives (instead of underwater basketweaving, popular at the time) mostly so I could fix my car radio, 8-track, etc.... Instructor was around 75 and wore a small black bow tie - not to be different, just because it had always been his standard dress code. He taught the latest technology, but also a couple of classes on vacuum tubes. What a great course that was.
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Per Snuffy "Hub Cap" McKinney:

This finally dawned on me when troubleshooting my #1 daughter's PC.
She breeds and raises Bernese Mountain Dogs.... long hair and lots of it.
Moving the PC from the floor to a table seems to have helped significantly, but hair/dust buildup is always the first thing I look for now.
--
Pete Cresswell

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(PeteCresswell) wrote:

Brushed off? Beware of static discharge which can damage something without even knowing it. I always wear anti static strap on my wrist and I'd not brush anything, just vacuum or use compressed air spray can. If board is taken out, I put it on anti static mat which is connected to wrist strap. My old habit.

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On 4/28/15 4:14 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

must be slightly conductive. If a circuit is on the table, a charge could come from friction with the table or friction with moving air.
It takes a special vacuum cleaner because moving air can put a charge on the tip.
I quit using static straps. I figured they weren't foolproof enough for a fool like me. I avoid opening a case if the humidity is below 60%. I lay a cotton cloth on my work surface and spray it enough that it feels damp. The assembly, anything I remove, anything I intend to install, any tools I will use, and an arm or elbow, stay on that damp cloth.
I don't trust moving air. I use a natural-fiber brush. I dampen it first so it's slightly limp.
Kind of like working with black gunpowder.
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On 4/28/2015 4:01 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Doctor: You have the most advanced case of tennis elbow I've ever seen. Patient: I'm a working man. I have never played a game of tennis in my life! Doctor: What do you do for a living? Patient: I work in a carpet store, demonstrating rug beaters.
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