Ceiling lights wiring plan

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I have an apartment that is being rewired and I am trying to find sample wiring plans for wiring the ceiling lights/fans. There are 5 rooms that will have ceiling fixtures -- LR, 2 BR's, a kitchen, and a bath. The apartment is being renovated so the ceiling is completely open and it will be sheetrocked later on and the apartment is over an open basement with an open ceiling -- so there is complete access from below as well as above. The circuit breaker panel is in the apartment, so the wiring can go up or down from there.
I've been looking on the Internet for sample wiring plans for ceiling fixtures in multiple rooms but I can't find any. All I can find are diagrams for wiring single rooms.
The person who is going to be designing the wiring circuits says his plan is to do it this way: run a feed from the panel box to the first switch from below, then drop down from that switch and go to the next switch, then down and to the next switch, etc. At each switch, run a wire from the switch up to the ceiling fixture that it controls.
My question is: Is there another way to do this where the feed would go from the panel box to the first ceiling fixture, then to the next ceiling fixture, then to the next, etc. Then, from each ceiling fixture, run a switch loop wire to the switch that controls it and code the white wire in the switch loop to black.
Is this an option? Do some people do it that way? To me, this seems like a more direct wiring plan with less wiring being used and fewer connections in the switch boxes.
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Either way is fine, or any combination of the two. The important thing is to have enough circuit, for the number and wattage of lights you plan to install. Be sure to use adequate sized boxes for the number of conductors, and depending upon what code you are using, you may have to keep bedroom wiring, which by NEC should be AFCI protected, separate from other rooms
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RBM wrote:

Thanks. That helps. I just couldn't find anything on the Internet that showed it either way. I'll bet it's there someowhere, but I sure couldn't find it.
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Disclaimer: not an electrician
I would do it as your circuit designer suggests but I would run 3-wire from the switches to the ceiling boxes in case the fan wants a separate hot for the light and fan.

Would work and probably meets code but why bother? I might do this if everything was closed up but wire is not that expensive.
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*It can be done that way, however I prefer the feed to the switches and just have the neutral and switch leg in the ceiling box. If you ever had a loose connection sometime in the future that affected the other rooms it is a lot easier to open up a switch than a light fixture or ceiling fan. Some lighting controls require a neutral conductor. If in the future you decided to move the ceiling box it is much easier with only one cable.
As someone else suggested it is a good idea to prewire for a ceiling fan with two wall switches, a three wire up to the ceiling box and a fan rated ceiling box.
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And any so called '3 way switches'* require three conductors (plus ground) . Note this is* where two separate switches control the same light or lights. Typically this is for a flight of stairs or for hallway.For example the first switch turns on the lights, you proceed up/down the stairs or along the hallway to say the bedrooms, and then turn off the light/s using the second switch. In the morning you reverse the procedure. Our bathroom has two switches one for the light and the other for the exhaust fan, they use 3 wires with the neutral being common. We added outlets in the bathroom a few years ago using a GFCI. and eliminated an old fashioned 'Shaver Transformer' outlet; which are now not to code. Am presuming any work done in the mentioned apartment will have to be inspected anyway, before it can be connected for service? So a call to the electrical inspection department might be a good idea.
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Len56 wrote:

the only suggestion i would make is to run the power to the ceiling boxes THEN just drop the switch cable to the switches. Less crowding in the wall box. There's more room for that crap in the ceiling boxes. Also, I second the notion to drop the */3 wire to the switches in case you want to control the fan and light separately.
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On Tue, 17 Mar 2009 22:53:22 -0500, Steve Barker

If you do decide to add another wire for a ceiling fan, make sure you have the electrician support the boxes to carry the weight for the ceiling can.
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metspitzer wrote:

Yes, for the rooms where there will be (or may be) ceiling fans, I already have ceiling fan boxes that are rated to hold up to 150 lbs.
One thing I noticed in looking for ceiling fan boxes is that they each have a different amount of cubic inches, which lets me know how many wires are permitted to go into each box. One ceiling fan box is a metal one that gets mounted to the side of a joist and can hold up to 70 lbs. That one has more cubic inches and can hold a lot of wires (I forget how many at the moment).
Another metal ceiling fan box that can hold up to 150 lbs. has less cubic inches and says it can hold up to five #12 wires. I think that means that I could not have a 12/2 feed going into that box, then and 12/2 going out to the next fixture, and also a 12/2 (or 12/3) going down to the switch.
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You are correct, which is one reason why it may be more practical to run feeds between switch boxes which can be 22cu. in. plastic or deep 4" square boxes with reducing covers, which give you plenty of room for cables, and as John Grabowski pointed out, much more accessible than ceiling boxes

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Len56 wrote:

keep in mind also, the canopy of a ceiling fan (or light for that matter) count as a junction box and therefore no junction box is actually required electrically. I have a number of ceiling fans in my rentals screwed straight up to the joists with the canopy acting as the j-box.
s
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*That is not true. The volume of space in the canopy of a light fixture or fan can be included as part of the total volume with the ceiling box. Article 314.16(A). The bracket that comes with the fan or light is not a substitute for a junction box. I guess permits and inspections are not required in your area.
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Steve Barker wrote:

That's what I was thinking and wondering about.

That's a good idea that I hadn't thought about until others and you mentioned it. Thanks.
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Totally incorrect. Most ceiling boxes are 4" round, and hold less wires than a variety of boxes used for switches

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RBM wrote:

Well lets see here. my standard wall box says it's 18cu in. The round ceiling boxes i use (when i use them) says it's 24.5. Seems to me 24.5 is bigger than 18.
s
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There is a variety of "standard" switch boxes, most will have more cu. in. than typical 4" round ceiling boxes.

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*Those 18 cu in that the box store sells for around twenty cents are homeowner specials. They save a few pennies and jam a bunch of wires in them. I've never seen smaller than 22.5 cu in installed by a contractor except pancakes of course. I prefer bigger boxes. It makes it easier pushing wires with devices attached.
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John Grabowski wrote:

are you talking about standard single rectangular wall boxes? I thought i bought the big ones. Do these you refer to come in blue plastic? Or what brand are they? My case is about empty anyway.
thanks
s
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Carlon makes them in blue, Slater makes them in gray, Other companies make them in black
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">>>>>> Is this an option? Do some people do it that way? To me, this seems

*Yes, the Carlon blue plastic one gang wall boxes.
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