cat5e and phone cable

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I need to run about 100-120 feet of cat5e cable to connect our bedroom to the utility room where the network switch, DSL router etc is. I ALSO need to run a phone cable, from utility room to the same bedroom. I am wondering if all 8 wires on a cat5e cable are used for Ethernet purposes, and if that is not the case, is there a couple I could use for phone. That way I could save $$ and time by running one cable instead of two.
i
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No all 8 wires are not used. An Ethernet patch cable has only 4 conductors - there should be a hint in that.
You mention a router... are you using only one port on the router? Not sure what your plans are.
Rich
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thanks.
The intended topology of our home network is as follows:
Wall -> DSL Jack -> DSL Modem -> Network Switch -> Linux box -> Windows XP box -> LinkSys wireless router -> Laptop 1 -> Laptop 2
DSL modem and network switch are in the basement utility room, and Windows XP box has been relocated to our bedroom on the opposite side of the house. That necessitates a 120 ft cable run.
i
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Ignoramus23410 wrote:

Also RJ45 and RJ12 plugs are physically compatible. That is you can plug an RJ12 (phone) into an RJ45(Ethernet). And if you use the proper wiring convention (forget if its 568A or 568B) the center wires will be open and you can have both phone and ethernet in the same jack. Not that you would want too.
At my old home I had 1 pair running up to my computer room that brought my ISDN line, 1 pair returning to the basement which was one of the house phone line that ran from my ISDN Adapter, and connected to the rest of the house phone lines, and 2 pair for ethernet that ran back to basement for my router in the basement. It was perfect.
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Just to jump into the middle here...
Gigabit ethernet DOES use ALL eight wires...
Even if you only do 100mb networking, having phone on the unused pair will still introduce noise and degrade your network.
Pull a separate line for telephone! Do NOT mix your networking with any other signals on the same bundle.
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Noozer wrote:

A phone line on 1 pair will introduce a lot less noise than a network line on 2 pair. Its negligible. I would mix. Hes not running an ISP anyway... Of course I am also one of those people that likes to have an extra pair, so if you can you might as well run 2. 2xcat 5 is preferred over 1xcat 5 1x phone line.
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Cat5 only needs two pairs of wires, but make sure you reserve color pairs. If you strip back enough of the outer sheath, you'll find that wire pairs are visible. Each color pair, like blue and white/blue is twisted and this is important for the cat5 spec. bill

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CAT5e cable is usually used for 100Mbit connections which require only four wires. However this cable has also been used for 1000Mbit connections which do require all eight conductors. If you don't plan on using Gigabit then you should be okay.
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wrote:

That's cool, I have no gigabit plans at the moment. Question of the day is, then, which wires are used. I understand that I could pick any wires as long as I connect them to the jack properly. I use Leviton jacks from Home Depot.
i
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http://www.la-cable.com/telephone_technical.htm#RJ-45%20wiring%20guide%2 0(TIA%20568B%20or%20AT&T) or http://tinyurl.com/9yjwr
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wrote:

Thanks. I found another page, which explains everything perfectly:
http://www.derose.net/steve/guides/wiring /
i
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On 6 Jun 2005 14:35:11 GMT, Ignoramus23410

Cat 5 is fine for phone and Cat 5 is fine for Ethernet, but it is bad practice to mix the two on the same cable. If at any time you have phone or Ethernet connection problems, you will need to know what arcane way the system was wired and it can make testing difficult unless you have good diagrams. The problem becomes more severe as the complexity of your system grows.
I'm not saying it won't work and it may be the cheapest way to go, but a Wiring Pro wouldn't do it that way.
Beachcomber
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Thanks, that makes sense. I am still deciding...
i
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On Mon, 06 Jun 2005 15:07:20 GMT, not snipped-for-privacy@xxx.yyy (Beachcomber) wrote:

I concur. Pull two cat 5 cables while you are at it and use one of them for phone and the other for computer. The cable is very cheap now.
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Beachcomber (not snipped-for-privacy@xxx.yyy) said...

[about using a pair of wires in an Ethernet Cat 5 cable for phone]

It would likely work, but at what quality? Even with twisted pairs, there will be some cross talk between them and the question becomes, "How much can you tolerate"?
For phone users, this cross talk will show up as hiss and other noise in the call. Depending on how much is introduced, this may not even be noticable, or it might be downright annoying.
For data, the cross talk will show up as data errors which will only be noticable as a slow-down in network traffic (as packets with errors are resent).
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On Tue, 07 Jun 2005 13:50:10 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@remove.daxack.ca.invalid (Calvin Henry-Cotnam) wrote:

We did some real life testing a few years ago at a large company that sells Business Machines Internationally. It is the ringing current that spikes the LAN and that is more pronounced if it is an old style magnetic ringer. We could not detect any problems with the phone. If you actually had some physical contact the ringing current would certainly smoke the LAN card.
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100base-T uses two of the four pairs. However, if you're thinking of upgrading to 1000base-T, you'd be out of luck - gigabit ethernet uses all four pairs and requires cat6.
I'd choose one of two options:
- Go wireless for both the phone (800mhz/2Ghz) and network (with encryption)
- Run two separate cables (one being cat6) and be done with it
http://www.zytrax.com/tech/layer_1/cables/tech_lan.htm
AL

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Thanks. We already have wireless phones. (2 bases with many receivers). I wanted to put a simple wired phone on the desk or next to the bed.

Maybe I will end up doing that. One advantage to dedicating a cable to ethernet is that it could run two parallel ethernet connections.
i

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A lot of times there is more to Ethernet than meets the eye. It's very easy to mess up the connectors and put the wrong colored wire in the wrong crimp slot. Often more is needed than just a simple continuity check. Running the cable too close to electric conduits or fluourescent lamps can cause problems. The mere act of stretching the cable with >25 lbs of force during installation can dramatically degrade the performance permanantly.
That's why they have guys going around with 5-10 thousand dollar Fluke meters going around certifying that the cable installation as meeting the performance standards for Cat 5, 5e, or 6. Many businesses require this.
For a home installation, you may not have (or even need) the big bucks fancy meter, but it pays to take extra care in doing the installation correctly and not mix it with phone wiring, doorbell circuits, etc.
Beachcomber
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