Cant remove ceiling fan canopy

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Want to replace a ceiling fan which has a remote control. I unscrewed the three (on this model, there are only three) screws at the top of the canopy. It twists an inch to each side, but won't come down. It looks like the metal inside the screw holes (what the canopy screws into) is also moving. How can I get it unstuck? Twisting over and over isn't helping.
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On Thu, 23 Jan 2014 20:44:01 +0000, scott

Try pushing up and then turning
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On Thu, 23 Jan 2014 20:44:01 +0000, scott

Most trist a few degrees, then drop - there are "L" shaped notches in the "bracket" and bumps in the canopy that fit in the grooves.
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*If this is a flushmount fan, you would need to remove the fan blades as well.
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replying to John Grabowski , scott wrote:

I have done that. No matter how I twist or pull, it just won't come down. I know the remote receiver is in the canopy...is it possible that the last owners stuffed it in there so now the whole thing is stuck? I am really at a loss of what to do, except smash it with a hammer. No, really.
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On Fri, 24 Jan 2014 16:44:02 +0000, scott

Googling for the assembly instructions was a pretty good suggestion.
--
I have tried everything else, I guess I am going to have to read the
instructions. :)
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*Can you post a few photos?
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replying to John Grabowski , scott wrote:

Thank you everyone for your suggestions. I hired someone, and he couldn't get it down either. He thinks caulk got in and made everything stick. (The last owners caulked the canopy to the ceiling, it got on the screws too which I finally got out.) He's bringing a crowbar on Monday.
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*I have run into that situation with smoke detectors that have been caulked around the edges. Usually my razor knife is able to cut through the caulk enough to get the old smoke detector off.
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It's hard for me to understand how the canopy can turn an inch in either direction and yet be caulked in place. What kind of caulk allows for horizontal movement but not vertical?
Color me suspicious, but the guy you hired didn't have enough tools with him to get the canopy off? You're replacing the fan right? Seems to me that any number of tools would have allowed him to get the canopy off as long as you don't care about damaging it.
Granted, I'm not there to see exactly what you're up against.
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On 01/24/2014 03:44 PM, scott wrote:

Tell him not to come back.
No way is a crow bar needed.
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replying to philo  , scott wrote:

You guys are great. Well, this guy has done decent work for us in the past...he was just stopping by to assess the situation first, and tried to get it down. The caulk around the top of the canopy is gone, so it twists a little. But that's it, so the guy thinks some caulk got inside.
It really is a puzzle...someone else pointed out that the ball rod hangs from something, so if it's lifted up, everything should come down. well, it doesn't. I think at this point if the guy uses a crowbar and fixes the ceiling (which he'll need to do anyway, since the new canopy is smaller than the hole), then just get it done. This guy isn't nuts. It could be he's wrong, but he's not crazy. Monday morning...stay tuned!
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On 1/25/2014 9:44 PM, scott wrote:

I might have missed something, here, but isn't there a center shaft with lock nuts attached to a base plate which has two screws? This should be inside of everything which would require removal of center hub/lights (if present). Most ceiling fans that I have come across go together in two to three stages. It would seem that you are starting in reverse order for disassembly. There should at least be a center hub that has a finished nut of some sort that needs to be unscrewed to gain access to the rest of the unit.
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On 01/24/2014 03:44 PM, scott wrote:

Like I said, if the contractor plans to use a crowbar it's time for another contractor...he does not know what he's doing...and using a crowbar will of course ruin your ceiling and worse still...the mounting!
If you want better help you should post a good, close up photo of as much of the interior section as you can get.
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On Thu, 23 Jan 2014 20:44:01 +0000, scott

If you are replacing a ceiling fan with a ceiling fan, I sure wouldn't take it down with a crowbar. Ceiling fans are heavy and have to have a very secure box.
What is wrong with reading the instructions?
A picture may help.
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replying to Metspitzer , scott wrote:

We bought this house a year ago, so the light was here, and we have no idea which model number (or even the company!). All we know is there is a remote inside, and it's not coming down. I have looked at other manuals and even called Hunter Fans, and the woman replied, "What do you mean you took out the screws and it won't come down, sir?" (Click). I don't know what you mean about two screws near the base and hub..I need an illustration. The lighting parts are off. Do I need to take off the fan motor? I don't know what that has to do with the canopy not sliding down.
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On Sunday, January 26, 2014 11:44:01 AM UTC-5, scott wrote:

As others have suggested, I'd google for the install manual. That may have pics that show how the parts come together. As others have said, if the 3 screws are out and it rotates an inch, I don't see how caulk could be holding it in. Nor do I see the need for a crowbar. How is a crowbar even going to engage with it? A flat piece of wood to protect the ceiling and a wide blade screw driver, painter's 5 in one tool, etc would seem to be a better option. Get that in there and pry down. But first I'd try to find pics via the install manual.
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On Sun, 26 Jan 2014 09:04:13 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Here is a shot in the dark. https://www.google.com/search?q iling+fan&client=firefox-a&hs=BYV&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&channel=np&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=w0vlUtjNIZHfkQeJuoC4Cw&ved AsQ_AUoAw&biw50&biht3#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=Tb7VOqhBZcVUAM%253A%3BtN2ZTCRAX1lXiM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fg-ecx.images-amazon.com%252Fimages%252FG%252F01%252Fth%252Fguides%252Fintern%252Fceilingfan%252FCeiling-Fan-Downrod-4C2._V188078327_SX300_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.amazon.com%252Fgp%252Ffeature.html%253Fie%253DUTF8%2526docId%253D2410524011%3B300%3B443
Use Google Images and see if you can find a similar fan to the one you have. You will regret damaging the box you are mounting the new fan to.
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replying to Metspitzer , scott wrote:

https://www.google.com/search?q iling+fan&client=firefox-a&hs=BYV&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&channel=np&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=w0vlUtjNIZHfkQeJuoC4Cw&ved AsQ_AUoAw&biw50&biht3#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=Tb7VOqhBZcVUAM%253A%3BtN2ZTCRAX1lXiM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fg-ecx.images-amazon.com%252Fimages%252FG%252F01%252Fth%252Fguides%252Fintern%252Fceilingfan%252FCeiling-Fan-Downrod-4C2._V188078327_SX300_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.amazon.com%252Fgp%252Ffeature.html%253Fie%253DUTF8%2526docId%253D2410524011%3B300%3B443

I've spent much time on Google images looking for this already. Nothing like it. Huge glass dome bowl, with three pins to hold it...agonizing to change a light bulb, 'cause once two pins get in, you cannot (!) get the third side over a lip to fasten it (I just took that little part off after hours of trying.) Everything else in this white fan looks normal.
By the way I really think the center pole and ball is only being held up by the canopy. but I can't figure out how the canopy was attached.
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On Sunday, January 26, 2014 6:44:02 PM UTC-5, scott wrote:

&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&channel=np&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa =X&ei=w0vlUtjNIZHfkQeJuoC4Cw&ved AsQ_AUoAw&biw50&biht3#fac rc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=Tb7VOqhBZcVUAM%253A%3BtN2ZTCRAX1lXiM%3Bhttp%253A% 252F%252Fg-ecx.images-amazon.com%252Fimages%252FG%252F01%252Fth%252Fguides% 252Fintern%252Fceilingfan%252FCeiling-Fan-Downrod-4C2._V188078327_SX300_SCL ZZZZZZZ_.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.amazon.com%252Fgp%252Ffeature.html%25 3Fie%253DUTF8%2526docId%253D2410524011%3B300%3B443


r

I seriously doubt the pole and ball is being held up by the canopy. The pole and ball sit in a subtantial metal hanger that is securely bolted to the electrical box. The canopy is essentially just a sheet metal cover. It couldn't support the weight, plus it would make it a bitch to install.
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