Can you paint pressure treated redwood?

We're building a wooden canopy and the redwood we bought for the supports feels kind of "moist". Can we prime and paint it, or do we need to somehow dry it out first? We won't do that. How about a special primer that works with "moist" pressure treated redwood?
Anybody with experience with this?
Mike
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mike wrote:

a wet batch and its just water. Let it dry for a couple of months.
When finishing it DO NOT use paint. If you want a color then use a solid color stain. Here is one good brand. http://www.nam.sikkens.com/product.cfm?product_id=1&product_category=exterior Also Cabots is popular, probably cheaper and easier to find than Sikkens. No sure about its quality though.
If you want only a hint of color get semi-transparent.
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I wouldn't put Sikkens on an abandon dog house!
20 yrs ago I had a house built. Transluscent Sikkens was put on the cedar siding at my request. It was advertised as not needing recoat for longer than paint. "They use it in Noooorway." (So what?). It was very expensive. Well in a few years it started to peel where the sun beat on it. Had the rep come out. Now he's suggesting a UV coat over it every couple of years. Why did I pay premium $ for something I would have to apply more often than less expensive paint. It was more expensive than top quality paint. He offered nothing.
We were talking about a LOT of exterior area. I mean a LOT. So I scraped and did do the UV coat. The shit also peeled in a couple of years. By now this crap was up to 40-50/gal and that was 20 yrs ago! I let it peel and did the unbelievable job of strip sanding the crap down to the siding over a period of a fall and spring season. Primed with something called Fresh Start and painted with 2 coats of Benjarman Moore. It came out georgous and outlasted the Sikkens by 2-3x easy. The original builder could not believe I had done it and done it myself. He had said that virtually every house he had already put the crap on at the owners request was peeling unless it was recoated every year or two. And that he now refused to put it on any house he built because he didn't want his name attached to any house with it on it.
I personally saw two other houses that peeled the same. One guy had a single story home and took all the siding off and reversed it.
I don't give a rats ass what they have done to it in 20 yers. The effort to fix that crap was immense.
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mike wrote:

Where did you find pressure treated redwood? I would not use that as it is the only lumber of its kind in existence. Very rare. In fact, it is non-existant.
Step two; you should not paint redwood. If you must cover it, tis better with a penetrating stain applied to preserve the beauty of the wood, while preserving it.
Step three; It will not be moist after a week or so out in the air, unless it rains.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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No such thing as pressure treated redwood AFAIK. Kinda pointless anyway, since redwood is naturally rot- and insect-resistant. It's hard to see any benefit from pressure-treating it.
What you almost certainly have is simply *wet* redwood. Or pressure-treated *pine*.
In either case, you need to let it dry out some before you paint it. If it's really redwood, you need to let it dry *completely* before painting, and prime with an oil-base primer. Then top-coat with either latex or oil paint.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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To know when your "pressure treated red wood" is dry enough buy a moisture meter, its better than an intelligent guess for your "ptrw".
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m Ransley wrote:

I appreciate all the help on this.
Mike
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I think the point of using redwood is that it doesn't have to be treated to last many years. It's also attractive without being painted. Isn't redwood more expensive that most other woods? Why did you use it if not for the advantages that it brings?
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mike wrote:

maintain periodically) you don't need redwood or pt. If you aren't going to maintain the paint, then pt becomes more useful but why paint it in the first place?
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