Can my breaker box affect my electric bill?

Page 3 of 3  
# Fred # wrote: ...

...
I don't believe current residential meters even in areas using peak rates peek at the individual phases, only the total. It's certainly possible to do so and is at large commercial 3-phase facilities but I really do not think it is so for residential customers. What residential peak rate tariffs I know of are actually only based on TOU rates--time of usage based on peak _system_ usage times, not actually rate-based metering at the individual meter.
So, I don't think the distribution panel loading balance would/will make any difference on the total peak usage monitored before the panel at the external meter. There obviously could be places which go to this level, but for residential tariff rules w/ which I am familiar that is not the case.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How do they do that? They don't accelerate the meter during peak hours, do they? That is, the face of the meter still accurately shows the watt hours?
Is there a separate counter not shown through the glass that keeps track of the off-peak (or on-peak) hour use?
I think I now have a radio transmitting meter, so they either have to drive through the neighborhood, or I'm told maybe they can read the meter from their office. If the latter, they don't take readings every time off-peak starts and ends, do they? That would do it but it seems complicated.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mm wrote:

...
Basically, the latter.
TOU meters incorporate a timer and have multiple registers. Residential variable-rate meters normally only permit two tariffs ("peak" and "off-peak") and in such installations a simple electromechanical time switch may be used. The meter will actually have two separate accumulators only one of which runs at a time--which is selected by the timer. The meter shows both peak and off-peak usage.
OTOH, large commercial and industrial loads may (do is maybe more accurate generalization?) use electronic meters which record power usage in blocks of half an hour or less. These demand-based meters do record much detail and commercial rates may be predicated on both time-of-day and system-load as well as the actual load and rate of use of the premise itself. Many really large industrial users have very complex load-reduction schemes in place to control their costs by load-leveling and scheduling.

No, if it is a new enough meter to incorporate remote reading _and_ is a dual-tariff meter it is probably microprocessor-based and all of the computations can be easily incorporated in the firmware. In that case it will have an onboard clock so the TOD and TOU info is readily available and the accumulation of usage at any given time is simply an accumulation into one of a particular number of (virtual, software) accumulators. There are various levels of hybrid (mechancial verus microprocessor-based) meters, depending on age and manufacturer in use.
Residential meters still outwardly look a lot like the "same old meter", but likely have at least some cpu-horsepower in them these days. But, since in most areas residential rates are still one tariff only, the emphasis has been on the communications and diagnostics to try to minimize costs to the utility in eliminating meter-readers and reducing/detecting tampering.
HTH...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

...
I intended to add this link to a description of a microprocessor-based meter--this isn't your grandfather's meter :) --
http://www.maxim-ic.com/appnotes.cfm/appnote_number/3764
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.