Broken Roof Truss

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I was up in the attic today, and noticed that I had a broken roof truss. Not sure how long it's been that way. It didn't look too new.
Anyone ever dealt with this?
Rather then replacing it, I was just thinking about sistering in (or sandwiching it ) another 2x4 with some screws and maybe some construction adhesive.
This pic I found is a pretty good likeness of it.
http://midfloridahomeinspectors.com/images/gallery-layout/structural_broken-truss-web-2.jpg
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http://midfloridahomeinspectors.com/images/gallery-layout/structural_broken-truss-web-2.jpg Never dealt with it as a truss. I have encountered something close as a rafter.
If it were mine, I would sister on both sides the full length of the run and call it done. I would use a lot of nails or screws and stagger them.
Colbyt
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I agree with Colby, wouldn't hurt to add construction adhesive as you proposed.
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote the following:

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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wrote:

will hold more and weaken the structure less than larger lag screws. I would definitely also glue the joint - good carpenter's glue would be adequate, and urethane glue like Gorilla Glue Or Leapages PL Premium would be excellent. drill the sister plates ovesize for one screw every 2 feet or so to pull the repair together firmly then drive the remaining screws. Properly screwsd together clamping would be totally redundant.
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On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 19:19:25 -0400, "Steve McElrath"

I am still looking for the truss plan I got for my addition but as I recall the engineered truss repair instructions for damaged trusses said you sister the whole length of the member or a max of 8 feet and use a shit load of nails/screws. The nailing schedule was on the plan. Nail guns are the preferred method to avoid further damage. To that end, big screws are better. Predrill the first few holes in one member a bit bigger than the screw to get a tight fit before you run in the rest of the screws.
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The construction adhesive (assuming good quality) will do more for strength than a whole bunch of screws or nails. In fact to do a superior job, the sistered stud needs to be well clamped in place before any fasteners are used. For fasteners some prefer ring shanked nails or star head construction screws.
Joe
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The problem with adhesives is getting the engineer who stamps the repair plan to sign off on the longevity of the adhesive. Make no mistake, a code compliant repair is an engineered solution. Usually a good truss plan will have repair instructions included for the various members so if it is damaged in transit, you are not holding up the job waiting for engineering or a new truss.
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Agree: For self home repair: To fix; if it is similar, say, to that shown in picture I would sister both sides with longest length 2x4s that will fit. Glue both side to the broken one using screws to pull the whole thing together. Don'think bolting through would be necessary! Maybe even a temporary clamp or two for few days! Be the strongest truss up there! Doesn't need to be thing of beauty, although ponder on why it broke!. We used lumber glue and then had to change something again; and getting the new wood out tore the surface off the wood after a only a couple of weeks setting up! No wonder some of it is called Gorilla or Bulldog, or something glue! Great stuff.
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On Sat, 10 Apr 2010 10:30:35 -0700 (PDT), terry

If there is no knot right there you have a valid question. If there is a knot there the truss manufacturer has a serious quality control issue. Was there any evidence of a roof impact? Did something happen in the attic? What do the connecting plates look like? Any signs of a lateral impact?
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On Sat, 10 Apr 2010 14:42:10 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I saw a house some years ago. The header beam across the garage double door was poured concrete and after years it failed. About the center it collapsed. You could see a "cup" in the roof. Didn't get to see the attic, but the contractor was "thinking" there would be rafter damage. Nothing hit the house, the beam just failed one day.
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On Sat, 10 Apr 2010 21:18:22 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I like words like obvious, ordinarily and consequentially ..
Helps me describe it.
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On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 19:19:25 -0400, "Steve McElrath"

Replace the whole 2X4. Easily done and the best way. I've sandwiched some 2X10 floor joists and could never get them to last long. Ended up knocking them out from center beam to sill and replaced them.
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A few years ago I did a repair like this and contacted an engineer buddy for advice. I placed strips of 1/2 plywood 8 ft long on either side of the truss Plywood ran the length of the brace overlapping the gussets. Jimmie
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Steve McElrath wrote:

http://midfloridahomeinspectors.com/images/gallery-layout/structural_broken-truss-web-2.jpg

I'd use some method of pulling it together before sistering anything to it. I'd probably get creative with some cable, eye hooks and a turnbuckle to bring it together, then sister one side, screws and glue! After a few days I'd remove the cable if in the way then sister the other side. Yes more small screws instead of less large ones.
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Tony wrote:

Lordy. It is a residential roof truss, not a damn bridge. Some 2x4s across adjacent trusses, top and bottom, and some hammered-in stiff legs between the 2x4s, and you can take all the load off the broken piece. Same concept as making a temporary wall when you have to work on a load-bearing partition. Either switch the broken board out and use new nailers or gussets to tie it back in, or sister both sides.
I probably wouldn't even make it that complicated. Measure the same piece on next truss over to get the length, cut the replacement, remove broken piece, reinstall using some sort of lever or jack if needed to get it back on the original mount points. I'd probably use a saber saw and metal blade to cut away that part of nailer plates, and put it back with oversize plywood gussets. A few dabs of construction adhesive to position them, and then screw the hell out of them. I used to see similar work done all the time down south, to repair where an HVAC guy butchered trusses to install something.
--
aem sends...

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The easiest thing to do if its broken like the OP showed in the picture is to just take that part out an replace it. There is no load on the thing.
Jimmie
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JIMMIE wrote:

What? No load? If there were no load on it the broken ends would be together and this thread never would have started.
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Tony wrote:

Load like in a windstorm or after a foot of snow in winter, or after the roofers dropped a whole skid of shingles right there. On a calm day, that strut is mainly holding the ceiling up below it. Trusses are so the rafters and ceiling joists can be real puny, and you can skip having a ridge beam. And mainly because they go up faster than a stick-built roof, and you don't need an expert there every day.
--
aem sends...

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