Boy, am I in the wrong line of work .........

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Yes it's expensive, but you have to keep some things in mind. It takes a lot of overhead before you can make any money. Overhead in time and money that you have to spend before you can charge anyone. If it's such an easy buck, then why aren't you doing it? You'll get rich quickly and easily, right?
Second, in that industry, you do not simply work 40 hours a week and get paid that same $250 an hour or whatever outrageous thing it is. Maybe you only get 15 hours a week like that. The rest of the time is spent dealing with obnoxious customers who never end up using your services, dealing with paperwork, buying material, etc etc etc. I'm not saying they don't make a good living, but I'm saying it's naive to think of it in terms of "Oh, this guy got paid this much for an hour's work, therefore he makes this much per hour."
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This reminds me when cars were first electronic. The mechanic would charge you $500 to put it on "the machine" to determine you needed a new board for $70.
If you can isolate the problem, and buy a new board or replace the internal panel, you'd be better off than the route forced on you right now.
When my dad's starter went out in his car, he replaced the entire line for $100 instead of isolating the particular part (diagnosis $500 part $10).
How old is your oven, anyway?
Steve B wrote:

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wrote:

I can fix practically anything from 20 years ago and before. At least there were discrete parts where one can figure out the malfunction and replace/repair a component. With modern appliances and equipment just replace the function module. It is a problem enough to take one apart (concealed snap-on tabs) let alone ID which chip is for what and there are no replacement parts anyway. And how does one solder PCB micro traces that one can barely see as separate conductors. Pointless repairs applies to many plastic parts in that if one part fails the associated parts aren't going to last much longer anyway.
Any item $200 and under is a throwaway product if you can't fix it within 30 minutes. Professional repair services find it cheaper to replace modules. At best they may accummulate a box full of "repairable" modules and rebuild them as a batch by mixing and matching good parts from several modules. There is no money in finding out how things actually go wrong and fix that anymore.
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Steve B wrote:

Steve, maybe this is a clue to simplify your life. We have a new, but very simple and traditional gas stove/oven. Knobs for turning the burners on and off, and we clean the thing ourselves when needed. The thing probably didn't cost as much as what the guy wanted to fix yours.
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