Beware marble countertops. . .

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Was the “sealer” water based or petroleum based?
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On 9/10/2012 6:43 PM, Ray wrote:

I live in karst country. Karst is limestone bedrock that has pockets and perforations caused by water containing carbon dioxide, which is acidic, gradually dissolving the limestone and forming caves.
Marble is basically limestone. The same process that nature uses to create caves works on your countertops, too - an acidic liquid working on the limestone, first etching it, then eating pockets and gaps.
For that reason, marble is not a good material to use as an all-purpose work surface.
I'm surprised the installer or supplier didn't try to gently persuade you to consider another material for kitchen countertops. They had to have known that it wouldn't be suitable for the kitchen. Or was this a DIY job?
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SWMBO and I recently took a hike through a gorge in a state park. Because of the drought, we were able to walk in the gorge itself instead of on the "Gorge Trail" that ran next it. We walked "in" in the gorge and "out" on the trail, mainly to get out of the sun.
As we were walking in I noticed the rippled rocks on the bottom of the gorge and mentioned to SWMBO how amazing it was that the millions of years of flowing water had formed thousands of these small indentations.
As we were walking out I stopped to read one of the information plaques that had been set up on the gorge trail. It turned out that I was wrong and that the indentations had been caused by the acidic rain pooling on the limestone and eating it away.
I would have prefered the cause to be the power of the river wearing away the rock, but I guess nature has many other ways of wearing things down.
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Hell Toupee wrote:

A minor FYI...marble *was* limestone prior to it being metamorphosed via heat and pressure. Still calcium carbonate but denser.
--

dadiOH
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