Beware marble countertops. . .

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We recently installed marble countertops in our kitchen, and it's been a disaster.
Almost immediately water-spots began to form, taking off the sealer.
Even worse, a little tomato juice fell onto the counter, and it was as if we'd put paint remover on it. Big ugly dull spots wherever the tomato juice fell -- and it was there for just a few minutes.
We called the installer, who came out and used a different sealer. This seem to withstand water fairly well, but the tomato problem is as bad as ever.
Has anyone else had similar experiences?
Any suggestions?
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On Mon, 10 Sep 2012 19:43:49 -0400, "Ray"

Do you mean granite?Marble is way too soft to make a counter trop from. I just put a granite top on the bar out by the pool so I am fix'n to learn about granite. There is no way I would have bought it but someone gave me a bunch. I am learning how to polish it right now.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in wrote:

I'm sure he means exactly what he wrote. Tomato juice would not harm granite, but it would definitely etch marble. So would vinegar, lemon juice, or anything else acidic.

Nonsense. It's harder than Corian or Formica which have been used successfully for countertops for decades, and it's waaaaay harder than wood (which has been used for centuries).
The reason marble is unsuitable for use as a kitchen countertop is that it is very readily etched by even weak acids. Common foods which would damage a marble countertop if spilled on it include: - wine - pickles - almost anything containing tomatoes - Coca-cola - vinegar - anything containing citrus fruits in any form, such as orange juice or lemonade -- and don't even think about eating a grapefruit over a marble countertop...
Granite has none of these deficiences -- but that's the result of its very low reactivity to acids, not its hardness.
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On 9/10/2012 7:43 PM, Ray wrote:

Might as well paint it. Marble is about the worst choice for kitchen counters I can think of. Look at the label on any product for marble care....
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That's what happens when you try and be fancy.
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No big surprise. Marble is very readily etched by acids. Tomato juice is an acid.

Yeah, pretty much everyone who ever put a marble countertop in their kitchen. Sounds harsh, but that's what happens when you don't do your research: you wind up with something unsuitable. And I bet you spent a s**tload of money on it, too...

Polishing it is the only way to remove the marks from the tomato juice -- those aren't just cosmetic marks, the acid in the tomato juice has actually dissolved some of the marble.
Once you have it polished nice and pretty, remove it and sell it for whatever you can get out of it, and replace it with something more suitable for a kitchen -- which is nearly anything except marble.
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Marble and many other stone tops are made to look at, not to use. While it does not look as good, it is still hard to beat the old Formica for a cabinet top that is made to use.
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On Mon, 10 Sep 2012 22:07:59 -0400, "Ralph Mowery"

Utter rubbish.
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On 9/11/2012 12:21 AM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Not utter rubbish, in fact mostly true.
The pure stone tops, granite and marble, are calcium carbonate which is attacked by acidic foods - granite less so than softer marble. Good finishes will make them more stable.
Lot of products on the market today are plastic with high stone content that look similar but are far more impervious to acids. That too would depend on the plastic binder where I believe acrylic resins are better than polyesters.
Pure synthetics like Corian are more chemically stable and can be repaired.
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Frank, .

Granite is a mix of many different chemicals but calcium carbonate is not common in graite. Where do you get your granite?
Dave M.
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On 9/11/2012 8:29 AM, Dave M. wrote:

You are right.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Granite
I made the common mistake of repeating something I read on the web and should have known better.
Marble is mostly calcium carbonate which makes it very susceptible to acid attack.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marble
Granite is still susceptible but not nearly as much.
Corian composition, I am very familiar with and it is polymethylmethacrylate with alumina filler making it the most kitchen food stable.
Frank
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On 9/11/2012 7:50 AM, Frank wrote:

Perhaps you didn't realize you just heard from the self imagined smartest person in the world? In that capacity they know everyone else is stupid so there is no need to discuss anything...

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Frank wrote:

Granite consists of numerous minerals. Among them...
quartz hornblende augite feldspars (there are various) calcite mica
The most dominant is feldspar. Both it and quartz are much harder than calcium carbonate. Calcite is calcium carbonate but there isn't much of it.
Most of the "granite" being sold isn't granite...it is crystalline igneous rock (as is granite) which can have many differing combinations of the above and other minerals.
--

dadiOH
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wrote:

Bullshit.
Marble isn't useful but there is nothing wrong with granite and it makes a *much* better surface than Formica (gack). People who can't afford granite use granite slabs for baking and prep. Having a *large* surface makes it all the better.

Irrelevant.
Irrelevant. They suck for other reasons. I'd use Corian in a bathroom but not a kitchen.
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On Tue, 11 Sep 2012 21:31:58 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Tell me more... I'm thinking of replacing my Formica Kitchen counter tops with something but have not yet looked into the pros and cons of the various options. The only thing I'm thinking specifically is that I don't want granite based on comments I've read there and there that it stains too easily.
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The comments you're reading here obviously aren't from people who actually have experience with granite.
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Oclipped

Corian, to me, feels rubbery. Not as hard as Formica and the coloring is less realistic.
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Agreed but it works better in the bathroom. I like the hard look and feel in the kitchen. OTOH, we like the granite in the bathrooms in the AL house and will be upgrading the baths in the new to granite as we go along.
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wrote:

Amazngly, sharp enough for spouse (she doesn't use the real kitchen knives, just the Sears steak knives my cousin thrice removed from Seattle gave us before our move to the Sates.

It is. It is a protest from the Lukoil station holders. They apparently have to pay 20-25 cents/gal more than everyone else to whoever plays Putin in Jersey. On the radio one station holder said he never buys his own gas, but goes to one of the cheapo stations.
Would be difficult to see me buying gas from a Russian outfit ...
--
Best regards
Han
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4ax.com:

I haven't tried chopping with a hatchet, but cutting up heads of lettuce doesn't seem to hurt. Remember, materials like Silestone are quartz embedded in a hard resin.
Also note that there was a chip in my counter that needed repair within a week of installation. Less than 1 square inch, and fairly shallow. They came with perfectly color-matched resin, and it is still very difficult to locate after more than 10 years. The seam between the 2 pieces is now noticeable, but barely.
--
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Han
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