Best way to get cologne smell off of painted shelf?

I just moved into a new apartment and the linen closet has this smell in it which smells like Old Spice or something. Looking closely at the shelves, I can see a few spots that look like something was spilled (these spots smell the strongest.
What can I use to clean this?
Also, the unpainted wood doors have a bad odor...not sure why...can I use furniture polish on them? They're the cheapie, light wood doors that have a thin laminate? maybe...there not solid wood. They're not painted.
tia
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Clean with Vinegar or if possible wet area with vinegar.
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malam wrote in

Diluted, I presume?
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malam wrote in

Diluted, I presume? What about the doors?
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I always use apple cider vinegar for taking away smells. I have no idea if the white vinegar works. Pour full strength apple cider vinegar into a shallow bowl and place the bowl on the shelf. Leave for a few days. The vinegar will absorb the odor. Replenish with new vinegar if the smell won't go away. Do not use styrofoam/paper since the vinegar will soak thru it.
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Use the vinegar full strength. When it dries the odour will go with it. I spilled gasoline on the interior of my car seat last summer when I was transporting a snow blower. The seat and floor carpet was soaked with gasoline and nothing I tried could remove the odour - until vinegar. I soaked the seat and floor carpet in it and left the doors open to get the seat dry. The odour was gone too.
On Thu, 14 Sep 2006 03:05:10 GMT, Patrick Maloney

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malam wrote:

It wasn't the vinegar - it was leaving the doors open. The gasoline, being very volatile, evaporated. The OP has a spill that might be perfume or cologne, which has alcohol for a solvent. It can be gummy or sticky when the alcohol evaporates, thus the suggestion to try alcohol first to get it up.

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Is alcohol = "rubbing alcohol"?
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Patrick Maloney wrote:

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malam wrote in

Thanks for responding. We're talking white vinegar, right? Every place I read says White = cleaning, apple cider = cooking...
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Patrick Maloney wrote:

and don't breathe too much of it. The odors are trapped in a closed closet, so it might help just to open it up, open windows, run a fan.
The bare wood, if it has absorbed a lot of whatever smells, can be sealed up with a clear finish of some sort.
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I see you got a lot of good suggestions. If they work, good. If they do not work, put a couple of coats of Bulls Eye shellac on the shelves and interior. That will seal in the odor and make it easy to clean.
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Thanks to everyone for the suggestions!
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Thanks to everyone for the suggestions!
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Agree with shellac as a sealer but Bulls Eye is waxy shellac that some topcoats would have adhesion problems while Seal Coat is dewaxed and can be used under any topcoat. Both made by Zinsser.
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snipped-for-privacy@vcoms.net wrote in

Can I just coat the shelves with this BE shellac and use as is? tia
A funny thing I read somewhere is that Bull's Eye shellac is approved for ingestion (when dry) as a candy coating (look under Non-toxic/hypoallergenic heading): http://www.wwch.org/Technique/Finishes/ShellacClassicFinBullEye.htm
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intend to put another finish on top. In fact, shellac is often used as a barrier between two incompatible finishes.
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