beeping smoke alarm at nite--why is this?

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On Sat, 14 Aug 2004 20:06:31 -0400, "Colbyt"

Is that how Bush got into office?
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outlaw
the
No, that's how Clinton got to stay in office even though he was impeached.
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MTBF simply means mean time between failures. What are they saying? the MTBF is 10 years? So what, do you throw away everything that goes past the MTBF?
Anyway, my 120V unit is just fine at 28 years old. The only failure part is likely to be the light bulb (1st one failed at about 15 years) and the light detector which hasn't failed yet. Reguards.
Gel wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net says...

No, but given that smoke detectors are safety devices, it's prudent to replace them periodically, to minimize the chance of them not working when they're required.

That may be, but the chances of a 28-year old smoke detector failing to work properly in a fire are greater than the chances of a new detector failing. Smoke detectors are the cheapest form of life insurance.
Regards,
George Wenzel
--
George Wenzel, B.A. (Criminology)
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Given how cheap they are to buy, it makes sense to replace smoke detectors periodically (every 10 years is the usual recommendation) - especially if the existing one is getting wonky.
Regards,
George Wenzel
--
George Wenzel, B.A. (Criminology)
E-mail: snipped-for-privacy@recursor.invalid
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Every single piece of electronic equipment in your house will wear out or become defective at some point. It's just a matter of when. Could be a month, could be 30+ years.
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"Joseph Meehan" >Jean S. Barto wrote:

I wouldn't advise that. Cutting the circuit, yeah, but not the whole house. Or perhaps I misunderstand?

At least 7 years old IMO. Virginia code went from battery to hardwire to hardwire with a backup battery about 7 years ago.
Smoke detector sensors do go bad.

Battery compartment's pretty obvious so I'm guessing your house is between 10 and 20 years old?

You only got one smoke alarm? Code calls for one per floor, and hardwired systems are usually interconnected - if one goes off in the basement and you're upstairs sawing wood the upstairs one is suppose to echo.
If you have more than one alarm check the others - they might have battery backups, but I doubt that's it.

Dude, she said no battery in the thing. 9V hookup is kind of hard to miss.
I'm guessing the unit's bad (or one of the units if there is more than one and interconnected)
We rented a beach house in Hatteras, 3 levels, from the top level down the alarms were 1, 2, and 2. We had the same problem, double-tap beep, nothing for about 3 minutes, then another double-tap, lather rinse repeat. I wound up pulling the power leads to the beeper (they were snap-in connections) and called the realty company the next day.
Jean, just go ahead replace the units if you don't find a bad battery somewhere in the (hypothetical) others. They're old and only semi-reliable, the sensors go bad over time. If that doesn't fix it call an electrician or a handyman if you know a good one.
Can't be too safe.
Marc, who changes the batteries every equinox.
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MrAoD wrote:

That is for new construction. Right or wrong, doesn't mean a thing is older homes.
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MrAoD wrote:

And if she builds a new house, that will be pertinent.

If indeed, it was taken down and out and inspected and not checked while twisting it and standing tippy toe on a chair.
Mine are hardwired. When they beeped (ALWAYS at 3AM), I learned that there WAS a battery. But I had to pull the wire off first. At 3AM, I moved to the guest room and let it beep. Figured out the wiring when I could focus my eyes.
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"Jean S. Barto" wrote:

Could be a lot of things. If you know the type, it can help. Also, consider what is different at night. As an example, the alarm installed in my house at construction over 28 years ago is the light at an angle type. In normal conditions, the light never gets to the sensor since it can't travel around a corner. Smoke will cause the light to disperse and some of it is reflected to the sensor. Unfortunately, tiny spiders ocassionaly find a home and construct webs which can blow and deflect the light to the sensor. That's one possibility, and if so, you can clean the passages, or just really blow the heck out of it with a vacuum. A burned out lamp will also cause a noise but it won't be just at night. A failing lamp may also set it off. Lots of other possibilities. The simplest solution is to replace it with a battery operated unit.
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If you sleep with the windows open, a temperature inversion can keep small amounts of smoke near the ground, and it drifts in and the smoke detector detects smoke even though you don't.
Get one with a snooze alarm.
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Ron Hardin
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040812 1750 - George E. Cawthon posted:

Everybody is in the house sleeping at night, exhaling carbon dioxide fumes and setting off the sensitive alarm system.
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indago wrote:

Yeah but! Smoke alarms don't detect carbon dioxide.
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then
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so
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Your house is on fire, you dumbshit!
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wrote:

I am real irritable when something or someone wakes me up. That thing would have been tossed out on the lawn the first night, if not smashed. Unless there is a dead backup battery, Replace it and get a good nights sleep.
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<SNIP story about it being an AC-powered rather than battery-powered, etc.)
I had this a few months ago (not night-specific but beeping only at times), and after a week or two found another smoke detector with a battery in it lying around somewhere and that was the culprit.
If you know for sure that you have zeroed in on the right detector, then replace it - especially if it is more than 10 years old. (Detectors showing no signs of anything wrong are usually good for 20 years, but I have heard that they are not perfectly-as-good-as-new after 10.)
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Don Klipstein wrote:

The problem is that you don't know if they are losing their effectiveness or not. It might look brand-new after 20 years, but when that time comes and it is 'needed', it may not work. That is why there is now a recommended 10-year life span on them. Don't risk it.
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