bathtub fitting problem

I am replacing my old bath tub. The old one has been taken out. The space is 60.5" x 32". The new bathtub measures 59.5" x 32". There is only one inch of extra space lengthwise. I could remove some support posts at the plumbing side to get an extra 1.5" lengthwise. That is 2.5" of space. I cannot get more space without removing all the brand new plumbing that I just installed. Am I kidding myself that I could move the bathtub into this space? Any ideas are appreciated.
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It can be done with a helper using an acrylic tub.
The hardest part is turning it into position once you get it in the room. It depends on the tub you select. It also helps if the stud wall is exposed on at least one side.
What you do is put the faucet end on the floor then lift the tub and lower the other end toward the floor. Most of the tubs I have seen will then settle into place because the non-faucet end has extra dead space. Then you just slide it into place.
You might even be able to use one of those 2 or 3 piece models if you are skinny enough to crawl out between 2 studs after attaching the back side connectors.
Colbyt
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I had the same layout and had no problem getting an acrylic tub in but I did have the room stripped to the studs. You shouldn't need any additional room provide the tub's apron can clears the stud.
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Yes this is an acrylic tub (actually a whirlpool) and not too heavy. I did some quick calculations, but I can't figure out how to maneuver the bathtub into place. The problem is with the skirt. It is rectangular and measures 21" high x 59.5" long. If I move one end of the bathtub into position and lower the other end, the bottom tip of the skirt at the latter end would need approx 63" to clear the wall: sqrt(21*21+59.5* 59.5)c. I only have 60.5" of length space. If I push one end in, and then push the other end, I would need even more space: 67.5". So, lowering it into position seems to be the best way, but I still don't see how it can be done with only 1" to spare.

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As the previous poster suggested, you might need to have remove the sheet rock and tile from one wall such that the skirt can be positioned between two studs and then slide the tub into position once it is horizontal. Once the tub is in place you will need to build the wall out to close the 1/2" gap. So pick the wall that is easiest to build out. Isn't bathroom renovation fun!
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I'm currently faced witht he same problem, only there is barley 1/4" to spare. In my case there is enough space in front of the niche to slip it in straight, in theory.
I had the demo guys rip out the plaster and gyp-board lathe back to the studs, all ther way out to the end of the niche. This allowed them to get the old tub out. However, the wall forming one end of the niche has a door in it, and it looks like the door frame, which sticks out 1" from the studs, is going keep the new one from going in. I cut a rectangle out of the box the tub came in to the exact size of the tub rim and there is no way it will slip in at the slight angle imposed by that door frame. I don't think tilting the tub end-to-end is going to gain anything. So, out comes the door frame. The project esculates!
Ed

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Phughes answered this correctly for you.
You let the skirt drop into the stud wall on the non-faucet side. 60 + 3.5 = 63.5.
I never said it was easy. I said it could be done.
Colbyt
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