bathroom rough in

Putting a bathroom in the basement and have to rough it in. Any tips or tricks to help me after I bust up the concrete floor?
Thanks
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First - Make sure there is nothing under, or in, the slab like pipes or what not.
Second - Make a cut with a circular saw and a masonary blade outlining where you want your openings.
Third - Get out your sledge hammer and pound away.
Options - Rent/borrow a demolition hammer and/or a concrete saw. These tools will add to the cost but may make it easier in the long run. It may not actually be faster, given trips to rental yard, etc, if your job is small.
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No wrote:

I rented a rotary hammer, drilled several holes on the perimerter of the cutout then smashed away with the sledge. Didn't take long and yes it does not make a neat hole but who cares, you need to put in new cement anyhow and decent floor covering anyhow. There are places where neatness counts and others where is doesn't.
Harry K
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A diamond blade cutting wheel works wonders on concrete slabs, when used in conjunction with an electric jackhammer, both available at any diy rental place. Cut the outline first and then jack the rest out. Makes a wonderful mess.
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Diamond blade saw and the basement = LOTS OF DUST!!!
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Did this for my parents years ago with one of those cheapo abrasive blades that go on a circ saw. Lots of dust is the understatement of the year. You literally couldn't see 4' in front of you in the room, and cleaning up the layer of dust that coated everything in the whole house was horrible (and it turned back into concrete if it got a little wet, .e.g. a damp dust rag...)
-Tim
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Yup, you gotta plan for this appropriately.
Turn off the central air for a while, surround the work area with plastic hanging from the ceiling, adequate cross-ventilation to carry the dust out... wear appropriate ppe, send the wife and kids out.
You (the OP) get the picture.
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I'd use the rotary drill and drill some holes and then sue the sledge. A lot less dust and less mess.
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You'll need a darned good lawyer.
-Tim
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I assume you are putting in an ejector pump for the bathroom right??
I located the pump not too far from the bathroom.
What I did was break up the concrete with a sledge hammer (its not too thick) First the ejector pump well (biggest hole) then from there I made a few holes where the pictures would be. I made little tunnels to the other holes. I dry fitted all my pipes (shower, toilet and sink) when all looked good I glued it all together. Backfilled all the pipes and all is working well.
The reason why I didnt just break up all the concrete was that I didnt feel like replacing all the concrete. I only had to patchup a few holes here and there....
The best question would be.... How did I tunnel out all that sand?? Easy I just used a shopvac. The sand is fine and dry. Very easy to get out.
Just a thought
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OK, I'm not trying to be a smarta**, but what in the world are "pictures" as they relate to this context?
-Tim
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BocesLib must have meant "fittings", holes would be requires wherever fittings would be in his method.
Cheers, Wayne
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opps typo... pictures = fixtures...
Wow my spelling is shot to shit.
Sorry :)
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Hi and thanks for all the replies, I am going to break up the concrete and connect to the main drain, what slope should I have? Toilet will be about 12 feet from the main.

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Rick wrote:

1/4" slope per foot.
More important, have you given thought to how you will vent all these fixtures?
Can we assume that city inspection will not be required?
Jim
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Are they allowing white PVC under the ground now???
I recall a few years ago they (around here on Nassau County, NY) they wanted cast iron to be used. I think they've changed that policy, but I was just wondering what others are allowed to use in their neck of the woods.
Tom
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