Basic Plumbing for shower install

I'm remodeling my bathroom, and about to complete the rough in of my shower/tub plumbing. I'm installing a Delta unversal valve. The model number is R10000. My question is in regards to the male threads, of which there are four, up/down/left/right. All of the litreature that I can find from Delta seems to indicate inserting the 1/2 copper into the "cup" of these connections, and then sweating the joint...leaving the male threads unused, I asume for iron pipe. Is this correct? And is this more fail safe than screwing on adapters?
Thanks for the help!
First time remodeler
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wrote:

This type of dual connection is pretty common these days on tub/shower valves and the like. As you say, if you are using 1/2" copper it will slide into the fitting and is sweat-soldered in place. Iron pipe is not/should not be used anymore for water, but if you are using 3/4 copper, or pex or cpvc or similar, then you use a female adaptor on the pipe and thread it onto the valve.
Personally, I prefer the soldered connection, but a properly made threaded connection is probably just as good.
Remember to remove the plastic valve cartridge from the valve body before you do any soldering. And it's a good idea to flush out the piping before you reinstall the cartridge by turning on the water with the cartridge out (be prepared, water will shoot out everywhere) to get rid off any loose bits of solder or copper or just dirt in the pipes; otherwise it will just plug up the ports in the valve later.
Good luck with your project,
Paul
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I, on the other hand, having paid a small fortune to replace a crapped out tub faucet, would vote for the threaded adapter, assuming this is an inside wall with an access panel behind. Makes it a lot easier on the next guy to replace.
aem sends...
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Thanks Paul,
I appreciate your information. This is inside a wall without other access, which is why I'm concerned about getting the very best connection that I can. Thanks for the tip on flushing the system.
Shawn
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On Sun, 07 May 2006 11:39:00 GMT, "ameijers"

I don't see how using threaded connections makes it any easier to replace. The other end of each piece of pipe (Cold in, hot in, tub out, shower out) is attached to something that doesn't turn. So even if it's threaded on the valve, there's no way to unscrew it. Unless you use four unions, and no way I'd bury even one union in a wall, let along 4.
So either way, you are going to end up cutting the valve out to replace it. A good reason not to skimp on quality.
Paul
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Seems to be pattern...easy on never means easy off.
I'll be soldering up the valve this evening. Thanks for the tips.
Shawn
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Remember to put the cartridge back in the valve body before you turn the water on. I no somebody that left it out , there was water running out the light fixtures in the kitchen below. I believe they lived in Sacramento.
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