Basement dryer venting problem

I'm trying to install a basement dryer vent and have a logistical problem that I'm hoping people could help me with.
The house I purchased has the dryer/washer in the basement laundry room. The basement is completely below ground level. The previous owners never vented the dryer outside and now I know why. Instead, they just vented it into the laundry room and placed a stocking over the end of the dryer hose to catch the lint.
A slate patio butts up right against the house. I measured exactly where the vent opening would come outside the house if I were to drill a 4 inch round hole and it would come out an inch or less above the slate patio - so this is not a viable solution. I should also mention that there is a window well on the cinder block wall directly behind the dryer but I do not want to vent out the window into the well as this would likely over time fill the well walls (more cinder blocks) with lint and look pretty crappy.
My other alternative is to run an extended length (maybe 15 feet) of 4" round dryer vent parallel along the floor/wall past the end of the patio and then out through the wall where there might be perhaps a foot of clearance off the ground (still not as much as I would like but better than no clearance).
Are there any other solutions I might investigate? I can't run a smaller diameter vent because of back pressure issues and such.
I am looking for any/all suggestions/comments.
Thanks! Walter
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I have a friend whos entire basement is below grade. They ran the vent straight out thru the wall and then straight UP to a cap that vents all around.
thats probably one option, if yo opt fpor the longer run theres a exhaust booster so you get enough exhaust flow.
shorter runs equal horter drying time,if your dryer is electric you might be better off keeping it indoors, in the winter the extra humidity is a side benefit
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Make sure the outdoor vent excludes birds and critters.
About 10 years ago I lived in a 2-story house with the ground floor masonry block and the second story wood frame. The laundry room was on the 1st floor. The outdoor vent came through the wood frame wall of the 2nd story, then went down to the laundry room.
Unknown to me, the flapper door on the vent fell off, allowing a bird to enter. When it got to the vertical part of the vent pipe, down it went. Couldn't get back up, so it went the other direction. Got itself wedged in the blower squirrel cage of the dryer, where it died.
Found it by smell some time later.
Ever since then, I have covered the dryer vent with 1/2 inch mesh screen.
Jerry
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Then run a rectangular duct vent. As long as the cross sectional area of the duct and vent is as big or larger than the equivelent dryer hose, it will be fine. Ample options in transitioning from round to rectangular along the way.
For a cap, look at parts used to finish off bathroom and or kitchen range vents. I know they have rectangular caps for kitchen vent hoods.
For 3"duct area= 7 square inches so a 2x6" duct with 12 square inch area should be fine for even a longer run.
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Wally wrote:

Most municipal codes require that a dryer vent must terminate to the exterior of the structure. Those who suggest that the extra humidity is the reason for interior termination do not understand the fire hazard issues with this.
A 4" rigid metal pipe is also part of the code. The smaller pipes get clogged more easily and void dryer warranties. Bigger pipes will not allow enough force to get the lint out. The 12" clearance off the ground is also minimum code.
If you use mesh or screen to keep critters out, moniter it for lint build-up.
Alisa LeSueur Certified Dryer Exhaust Technician http://CleanYourOwnDryerVent.com /
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Wally wrote:

Most municipal codes require that a dryer vent must terminate to the exterior of the structure. Those who suggest that the extra humidity is the reason for interior termination do not understand the fire hazard issues with this.
A 4" rigid metal pipe is also part of the code. The smaller pipes get clogged more easily and void dryer warranties. Bigger pipes will not allow enough force to get the lint out. The 12" clearance off the ground is also minimum code.
If you use mesh or screen to keep critters out, moniter it for lint build-up.
Alisa LeSueur Certified Dryer Exhaust Technician http://CleanYourOwnDryerVent.com /
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Recently I bought two nice new vent hoods with flapper and screen.
After the screen clogged FAST I removed and tossed them out/
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How about this? Run the rigid 4 inch ducting through the nearby location, then outside have it make a 90 degree turn upwards for a couple of feet (above projected snow line) and put a top cap on that. Tomes - who is not hip on codes but just had this thought....
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On 26 Jun 2006 12:00:13 -0700, someone wrote:

What are your house's above ground walls made out of?
Run rectangular duct up the wall a couple of feet? Then turn and terminate outside. No, an actual 4" duct doesn't fit in a "2 x 4" wall since a "2 x 4" (nominal) is only 1-1/2 x 3-1/2 actual. That's why I suggested going to rectangular.
If it esthetically feasible to pad out or chase out the wall in that one small area, then a lot of ducting problems can be saved and a regular 4" round used. It doesn't take much, just the thickness of the sheetrock (plus the stud) is enough to fit the duct, and then if you cover the small area of missing rock with a decoratively edged cover....
Reply to NG only - this e.mail address goes to a kill file.
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