BaseBoard and Radiant heating question

Hello,
I am in the process of completing a master bedroom in the basement. Yes there are the appropriate exits to the outside and the radon is under the limit of 4.0.
Anyway, I have tapped the forced air system for heat to the bedroom. I would also like to install a baseboard unit to just help out a little on the cold nights (we are expecting the baby in January). Where the room is now was an electric stove run on what I believe is 8/2 with a stranded ground. It is copper wire. I was going to use this to run a sub panel to power the bedroom and bathroom circuits.
Anyway, I suppose I'd be better off running a new 220 circuit from the main panel for the baseboard heat. Should I do this or is there such a thing as a 110V baseboard heater that I could run from the subpanel?
In the bathroom there will be ceramic tile area of about 2.5 feet by 5 feet. We want to put radiant heat under this. Should this be a separate 220 feed from the main panel or once again can I run a 110 leg from the sub panel.
Finally, the baseboard heat I was looking at says it is 1500 watts. Following the rule A=W/V 1500/220 = 6.9 Amps, what size wire and breaker combination do I use. I would have the same question about the radiant floor heat but I am not sure what I am going to use yet.
Thank you, Fred
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<SNIP>
Sorry to highjack your thread, but what is this thing about radon?
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Basements are susceptible to a radon gas that can cause lung cancer. There are test kits you can get at the home centers that you leave in a given area for some set amount of time. Then you send them to a lab to be tested. The EPA suggest a level of <4.0pCi/L , anything higher and they suggest mediation efforts.
Fred

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031110 2107 - Frederick Wilson wrote:

You could use the 8/2 w/ground for your new electrical panel in the basement master bedroom, but you would have to add another wire. If you cannot easily change the existing cable, then you can add a new grounding wire from the existing service panel to ground the new panel in the bedroom. Use the existing stranded cover on the cable for the Neutral. The ground and Neutral in the new sub panel must be separated. You can use 15 amp 2-pole circuit breakers for the 220 volt electric baseboard and the bathroom floor heating. A 14/2 w/ground cable will work for the baseboard electric heat.
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