Barn Neutral Saga Continues (Was Bizarre Electrical)

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On 11/05/2015 7:09 AM, dpb wrote:

without affecting another run, that is...again, almost anything (outside putting the toothpaste back in the tube) is possible, at least theoretically.
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them being "less likely to fail". Assuming you have an insulated wire crimped to the bare support wire. Remove a little insulation just before the crimp. Take some auto jumper cables and jump across that crimp. (with the power off). Turn power on and see if you now have a working neutral. It would be best to tape where you removed the insulation afterwards.

All that wind and it did not blow the wires enough to make contact again. That tells you it's more than a loose connection.
If you use the jumper cables, just use either the red or the black, not a red on one side and black on the other. I'm sure I didn't need to tell you that! :)
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On 11/05/2015 10:10 AM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

A single connection, sure...but there is more than the one from the barn to the line pigtail in there and the others _in_the_same_crimp_ don't have an issue. I'm having a hard time imagining that physically.
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On 11/05/2015 11:41 AM, dpb wrote:

These are an unusual crimp I've not seen elsewhere...they apparently had a multi-faced die as the shape of the finished crimp isn't just round...I suppose some hot then new gizmo tool of the time.
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On 11/05/2015 12:25 PM, dpb wrote: ...

Actually, on inspection up close, there were apparently multiple heads/sleeves for 2-, 3-, and 4- conductors in this system. It's about a 3 to 3-1/2" long sleeve and there's a visible crimp on the four-conductor one from each of the four angles and was an open-ended die; there's a small visible nib on the open side. Those connections appear still nearly pristine. There's a solid filler Al conductor in the middle that prevented leaving a hole in the middle of the spliced joint.
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On 11/05/2015 11:41 AM, dpb wrote:

Well, turns out we were both sorta' right and sorta' wrong! :)
When I got off the ground and up there I could then see what was hidden from the ground--the others in that big group _are_ in the funky crimp; the barn however is alone with a conventional split nut. From the ground that wasn't visible at all.
Turns out that connection had been loose for quite some time and had sufficient corrosion built up to cause the problem. Took some fine scotchbrite pad material up w/ me and unstranded the loose end and polished them up, did what could on outer surface of the other splice area and used a new connector and voila! all is well.
Surely glad have the lift; a neighbor fell from a ladder and was killed just last week in his barn/shed retrieving some things was going to donate to fundraising auction being held for his grandson of about 5 who's been in Denver for last 2 years undergoing treatment for brain tumor...no good deed goes unpunished, apparently. :(
Anyway, to finish this off, it was, in the end, pretty mundane having started with my brain cramp of not thinking of the mechanical carrier cable being the neutral--one of those "know better, just not thinking" moments.
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Congratulations !!! You finally found the problem.
Did you use that grease that's supposed to prevent corrosion? (I dont recall the name of it). If not, I'd tape it real well to prevent future corrosion. Rubber tape is recommended over the common "electrical tape". Then you wrap over the rubber tape with the common stuff to keep it fron unwrapping.
The connector being loose caused arcing which just caused more corrosion to occur.
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On 11/5/2015 7:09 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

I've heard of Noalox, but also that has caused some problems for me. Dielectric grease at Advance Auto parts (in tubes with the RTV aisle) is good and less expensive than smaller tubes.
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dont have a lift. I refuse to go on a pole with a ladder. Safety is one reason, fear of heights is the other. I'd rather pay someone to do it.

That cable is called TRIPLEX. 2 insulated, 1 bare support wire. That support wire is very strong and I've wrecked several cutters trying to cut it. I dont know what kind of metal they use, but it's hard to cut. An angle grinder is probably the best cutting tool.
By the way, you said that lift weighs 12,000 lbs. Are they really that heavy? That's 6 tons and is one huge machine..... I've never owned or used one of them.
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On Thu, 05 Nov 2015 18:38:35 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

The local power company uses type ACSR as the neutral/grounded messenger. This translates as Aluminum Conductors with Steel Reinforcement. Damn hard cut!

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On 11/05/2015 6:04 PM, Mr.E wrote:

This is just #2 AL triplex, not ACSR...they're all fairly short runs so it's "strong enough".
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You might also look at the split-bolt connector. If it is copper, the connection will corrode but if it is silver colored and has a shoe in the slot, it is copper to al or al to al and should hold up well as long as the differing wires are separated by the tin plated shoe.
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On 11/06/2015 9:10 AM, Mr.E wrote:

It is Al...and the weatherhead connections at the barn end use the Cu/Al ones w/ the bimetallic center, yes...
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That is what the manual says.
https://csapps.jlg.com/OnlineManuals/Manuals/JLG/JLG%20Boom%20Lifts/40H/Service_3120240_10-11-01_ANSI_English.pdf
Where I worked we had one that would go about 60 feet and another one made by Mark Lift that went to about 60 feet. When you get the boom out that far at around 45 deg and around 600 pounds on them (think that is what one was rated at) you want a lot of weight holding it down.
I have driven and used both of them lots of fun at 20 or 30 feet, but at 60 feet it gets some what shakey when moving the bucket around. I only used them about 5 or 6 times a year, so not enough to get comfortable while the boom is all the way out.
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On 11/05/2015 6:09 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

I thought I had a 60-footer located but it got taken off the market for local sale, apparently. This will just reach the eaves of the barn cupola so that to get up there I still had to set up scaffolding (took two high) and a walkboard. I've yet to finish the very top flashing and there were a couple of broken lightning rod globes so they've not gone back up yet, either. I'd love to not have to get the scaffolding back up there again...
But, when I was looking was when I still hadn't bit the bullet and done the seal kit for the main extend and lift cylinders but finally just took it to the Deere dealership in town we deal with all the time and had them done. With that now done it's harder to justify the extra outlay... :)
I really don't know what I'd do without it around the place now any more, though. Besides the barn, the old house is 2-story 1:1 pitch so anything up there is also a real trick; you _can_ stay on it, but it's spooky when younger and now it's a "no way!"...
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I had my house re roofed this summer. Eight Mexicans showed up to do the job. The pitch is almost that great, close to 45 deg. One side of the house is only one storry off the ground,but the other side is about 25 feet off the ground. They carried all the shingles up ( about 28 squares) by hand. Did not use any safety ropes. They did throw a couple over the roof and when carrying some up, might grab the rope with one hand. I was sure one was going to roll off, but they did it without problems. Seemed to do a good job too.
I started to go on the roof years ago, but chickened out. I am not afraid of heights, put up a 60 foot ham radio tower doing all the tower work and climbed up the outside of 100 foot silos at work. I just need to feel safe on what I am standing on. I try to stay off extension ladders. Just can not help feeling the bottom will slip.
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On Thu, 5 Nov 2015 19:42:47 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

I am afraid of heights, but I can go on a roof that's not too steep, or will go up a ladder but 25ft is about my limit. But the ladder MUST be against a solid wall. Round power poles are a NO-NO. When that ladder starts to walk around the pole due to the roundness, I'm not going up there.
The way to keep an extension ladder from slipping on the ground is to park a tractor or pickup truck there and put the bottom of the ladder against the tractor loader or truck bumper. To make it even more secure, tie it to the loader or bumper. I always do that if I'm going higher than about 9 or 10ft.
I've had more problems with step ladders being used outdoors. I had one on a deck with a thin layer of snow. I went on the nearly flat deck roof to shovel off the snow. When I finished the shovelling, I steped on the ladder, it slipped and then one of the legs bent and I went down with that damn aluminum step ladder (11ft). I ended up in the hospital. Luckily I was not seriously injured. I will never own another aluminum step ladder. I'll trust a wooden one any day over aluminum.
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On Fri, 06 Nov 2015 06:19:36 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

ladder. That said - I prefer fiberglass. A new wooden ladder is good, but after a few decades I'd take aluminum over wood any day of the year.
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On Friday, November 6, 2015 at 12:18:49 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The stepladders we used in maintenance overseas had the steps on both sides. That made a lot of sense, it was much easier to get them positioned, and if need be you could have a person on each side.
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Most of the ladders where I worked were like that. Someone in the safety department decided that because of an electrical hazzard all of them had to be fiberglass and had to have the heavy duty rating of a lot pounds, I forget how much. They had to have an inspection sticker on them that was renewed every year. Funny thing was that we could inspect our own ladders and if they did not have a current sticker, we could put one on.
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