Barbecue Grill burner replacements

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From my experience with walking by good restaurants, I think you mis-spelled :)
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Joe Pfeiffer wrote:

Who said it was good? Do you like the smell of burning oak and pizza crust?
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If the crust is burning, no. If it's cooking, yes.
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Joe Pfeiffer wrote:

it smells like pieces of the crust are left in the oven, till they completely burn away. :(
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FWIW, has anyone considered a fully ceramic grate?
One approach would be to bond pre-made ceramic rods with an ordinary pottery clay, which could be fired as an assembly, then moved as a unit.
Another would be to cast/mould a grate-like assembly in a sheet, dry, fire, glaze, and use it both as the heat diffuser and as a food grill in a gas- fired grill (or charcoal).
'Tis hardly metalworking, but metals don't usually hold up well in that environment.
LLoyd
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Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

ordinary ceramics don't like to go through quartz inversion temp very quickly (either up or down). i'd bet they'd self-destruct pretty quickly.
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I've got some ceramic support rods for heat-treating that pay no never mind to cycling a thousand degrees in one or two minutes. They were once "honing rods" I re-purposed.
I really don't know what's in them, but they can go from cold to bright cherry red in seconds, and never even breathe hard.
They don't look "glazed", per se, but they're polished, and most likely not very porous.
Just from knowing about milling media, I'm betting they're high-alumina ceramics.
LLoyd
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On Mon, 29 Mar 2010 23:46:01 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

Man, that has got to be expensive unless they have a source of *very* cheap firewood.
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On Sat, 27 Mar 2010 21:32:21 -0600, Joe Pfeiffer

had set out to the curb, stripped out the burners, and uses charcoal on the rock grid. Good cast aluminium housing on a decent stand, works great! Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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wrote:

Charbroil used to make a nice charcoal grill that had the cast aluminum housing,with cast iron cooking grids and a moveable coal grate so you can bring the coals closer to or away from the cooking grids.It had a removeable ash drawer to make emptying the grill easier,and you could close up the grill and put out the coals for later reuse.Sears also sold the same unit under their brandname.
I have one,but the cooking grids have rusted away. I made replacements for the coal grid and ash drawer after they rusted away. It's at least 25 years old.
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Hmm, spend 45 minutes replacing the burners once every 8 years....
or...
Spend 45+ minutes building a charcoal fire every day to grill a couple of burgers...
Tough choice.
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Hmm, spend 45 minutes replacing the burners once every 8 years....
or...
Spend 45+ minutes building a charcoal fire every day to grill a couple of burgers...
Tough choice.
I have both charcoal and gas BBQs. the charcoal is both an offset smoker and you can use a grill over the charcoal to cook. Why both? Charcoal does a better tasting grill and gas so the wife can BBQ or I just want to do chicken and do not want to wait for the wood fire.
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ignoramus11443@NOSPAM.11443.invalid says...

You can buy various shaped and sized SS burners at any Walmart:
http://www.walmart.com/ip/Dual-Bar-Burner-Stainless-Steel/10846840
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unfortunately, it is wrong shape.
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I put a SS burner in mine about 4 years ago. No problems so far but cant really say as the original ones lasted for 8.
Jimmie
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On Mar 27, 5:21pm, Ignoramus11443 <ignoramus11...@NOSPAM. 11443.invalid> wrote:

Eight years on a set of burners is not bad.
I have a SS grill that I bought in 2005. It gets moderate use....maybe a once or twice a week on average.
My grill has three cast brass burners....One is now split along the line of gas flame location holes and needs to be replaced.
I can get brass ones ($150 for a set) or cast iron ones for less than half. I doubt that cast iron will perform that much worse than the brass did.
Cast iron is a pretty decent material for a burner...but there are "good" cast irons and "bad" cast irons.
I'm guessing that your original iron burners were cast iron.
Replacement SS burners can vary widely in performance. Spraying water on the grill to keep the flames down will severely reduce the life of SS burners.
Per the other post.........burners are consumables.
cheers Bob
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wrote:

And good and bad stainless steel I read in a recent thread in AHR.

Amd any other kind, right? I never understood keeping the flames down. That's the exciting part of grilling.

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But not a part that leads to food that tastes good.
But the right way to keep the flames down is to limit airflow. If you're under a smoke hood, the flames can't get high.
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On Mar 27, 6:21pm, Ignoramus11443 <ignoramus11...@NOSPAM. 11443.invalid> wrote:

Wel, I don't know where you're at, but pretty much all the big-box home improvement places here carry replacement grill burners in stainless 12 months of the year and a good number of the regular hardware stores do in season, meaning once they drag the mowers out. A grill cover does wonders for weathering on grill innards, too. Getting one of either off the shelf to fit your existing grill is the trick. Haven't seen cast-iron burners for anything but fish cookers, though. Haven't had rust problems on my example of those, yet, just gets oil on it and in it every once in a while from a boiling pot. I did paint it with high-temp exhaust paint, though. Check Ace, True Value, HD, Lowe's, maybe Sears/K-Mart, WalMart, Menard's, whatever you've got. Somebody's got to have them.
Stan
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8 years is a long life. You must not cook very often.
The SS burners are about as good as it gets. The cast iron will crack over time. The chrome will go faster. On the average I get about 3 years from a SS burner which is used about 48 weeks per year in all kinds of weather. The cast iron lasted about the same amount of time. I suspect the heat cool cycles in colder weather affected that sine cast burners on stove last for many years.
I had a hard time accepting that they meant to be a consumable product.
I suggest a Google search using both the model name and number and with just one of each. That looks like a proprietary design so you may not have a lot of choices.
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