bale wire jars

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I bake a lot of biscotti, here. A key issue in retaining freshness -- as with most baked goods -- is an air-tight container. During the humid season (Monsoon), biscotti that are *not* "protected" lose most of their culinary appeal in a day or two!
"Tins" were the old-school solution to this problem. But, as hands (fingers) get older, they are often difficult to pry off (nothing really to "grab onto").
Presently, we use a bale wire aluminum can as it is deep enough for the biscotti to stand on end (about 8") and has a wide enough mouth for the cookies to stand next to each other (also about 8") without trying to funnel through a narrow opening. For folks old enough to remember how pretzel rods were sold at the bakery counter...
This also facilitates cleaning.
But, the lid is plastic instead of glass. As a result, it is already showing signs of wear (cracking due to being under strain from the clamping mechanism). And, I've already had to replace a rivet that failed from continued use (this is used EVERY day).
For reference, a bale wire jar: <
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41gDt02lLCL.jpg
the lid is sealed with a rubber seal and held under compression via the clamping mechanism.
But, I can't seem to find any similar jars that are *large* enough. E.g., at least 7-8" deep and at least 6" diameter (if round). Anything smaller would either not hold the cookies (too short) or not hold *enough* of them (too narrow).
SWMBO really likes the "action" of the clamp as it's relatively easy to open and reclose -- without bothering arthritic knuckles, etc. Tins are out. Canister style containers (e.g., with a lid that has a soft outer edge that "plugs" the opening) probably won't seal as well.
Do they *make* any such beasts? Or, is the shape not appropriate for their typical uses (whatever *those* might be)?
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On 11/11/2015 9:54 PM, Don Y wrote:

You might search for wire seal canning jars. They come in lots of different sizes, but you may have to order something like the specific size you need. You can usually find the common sizes for sugar, flour, etc, but other sizes are like hit and miss in the stores as far as my own observations.
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Maggie

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On 11/11/2015 9:08 PM, Muggles wrote:

ISTM that the image search turns up the same results for "wire seal canning jars" and "bale wire jars". As I said to IdleHands, the openings seem to all be the same (dia) regardless of jar size.
I have no idea where I bought the current *metal* container but regretted the plastic lid at the time of purchase. I had hoped it would prove more robust than it has, but...
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Don Y wrote: ...

they do make large mouth canning jars which you can reach into without any trouble, but they are usually in quart sizes at most places i see them. some larger ones can be found too, but not as often...
as the large mouth jars are commonly available there are various lids for them.
for those that have trouble opening or closing them there are various gadgets for that available.
songbird
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On 2015-11-11 8:54 PM, Don Y wrote:

http://www.containerstore.com/s/kitchen/food-storage/jars-terrines/hermetic-glass-storage-jars/123d?productId 011037
These might work for you.
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On 11/11/2015 9:26 PM, Idlehands wrote:

Thanks but I'd already found them. The larger sizes suffer from the "narrow neck" problem. Imagine the 7 oz version enlarged from 3.25"dia x 3.5" high to *7*" dia and height. KEEPING THE MOUTH AS WIDE AS THE JAR!
With the narrow mouth of the 3.2 qt jar, you lose several inches of height -- i.e., the height directly beneath the opening is much higher than out by the edges. (also, 5.5" dia is probably too narrow to store a full batch of cookies)
Moving up to the 4.2qt gains back this height (the entire jar is 1.5" taller) but now you'll be trying to extract the biscotti using "two fingertips" as a sort of tweezers (your hand being too small to reach *into* the jar to grasp with thumb and forefinger).
I'd wager that all of these jars use the same lid/cover and just alter the volume of the jar.
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On 11/11/2015 10:42 PM, Don Y wrote:

This is a huge jar (comes in varying sizes) with a 3.5 inch diameter opening, so your hand would easily fit inside it:
Bormioli Rocco Fido Round Clear Jar, 169-Ounce Price:     $14.99 (Amazon.com product link shortened)
There's a smaller square style, if you don't need such a large jar:
Bormioli Rocco Fido Square Jar with Blue Lid, 33-3/4-Ounce Price:     $8.61 (Amazon.com product link shortened)
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On 11/12/2015 6:23 AM, Moe DeLoughan wrote:

I must have big hands :> A Mason jar has a 3" *INNER* diameter top (i.e., the OPENING is 3") and I can't even get four fingers into it! A 4" dia PVC pipe that I happen to have handy is do-able... but I'm not sure how effectively my hand would be able to navigate the contents of such a jar to find a particular cookie (esp if the jar isn't transparent -- I realize the jar cited *is* clear). Remember, a cookie can end up "falling flat" to the *bottom* of the jar requiring you to put your entire hand in the jar just to reach the cookie (when the jar is full, the cookies force each other to stand on end; as cookies are removed, there is less constraint on those remaining so they tend to fall over. Jar in question is 11 inches tall -- so, you've got all of your hand and wrist completely *in* the jar to reach the "dead soldiers" on the bottom!

Our current jar is a bit over a gallon in volume (probably close to that 169 oz size). And, almost exactly as tall as the biscotti are wide (keeping in mind that they stand on end in the jar). That's a bit more than is required for a single batch. But, the "excess volume" takes the form of "space for additional biscotti ALONGSIDE the others" instead "above them". So, opening our jar when *full* makes easy pickings of the contents. And, as the cookies start to "slump" when the jar empties, you can still just peek in and grab whichever one you want.
I'm convinced the mouth of the jar needs to be the same as the width of the jar (i.e., no "neck") to be a good fit.
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On 2015-11-13 11:43 AM, Don Y wrote:

Empty pickle jar? Or maybe a set of pickle tongs?
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Froz...

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On 11/13/2015 9:49 AM, FrozenNorth wrote:

Pickle jars typically have screw on lids and retain the vinegar odor indefinitely (I try to "collect" large glass jars for storing things like popcorn, barley, oats, etc. -- pickle, relish, mustard, etc. containers are simply impossible to "desmellify")
Would you want to have to keep a set of tongs on your kitchen table alongside the LARGE jar just so you could retrieve cookies? Or, have to fetch the tongs each time you wanted another one?
[Imagine eating a can of Pringles and *not* tipping the can to extract its contents but, instead, trying to fetch each chip individually "from above".]
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On 2015-11-13 4:09 PM, Don Y wrote:

the bottom, so no that wouldn't be a problem for me.
Another idea is large olive jars, there are *very* big ones, out there, my buddy got them and we could cram an entire sleeping bag into one for canoe trips, just in case we tipped, you do not want a wet sleeping bag at the end of a long day paddling. Our sleeping bags never smelled like olives even though they were plastic jars. I have no idea where he got them.
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wrote:

There are a few possibilities here at Bed, Bath, and Beyond: http://tinyurl.com/nlrvhgz Would a coffee container fit the bill?
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On 11/12/2015 5:28 AM, Dean Hoffman wrote:

That looks like the container that we currently use (I'm going to guess we have the 130 oz size (about 1 gallon volume) given the choices they present. It's problem (aside from being poorly made) is the top is plastic (acrylic) and cracks from the continued strain of being under compression all the time (cuz it's always "sealed").
If the lid was made of glass (like more traditional bale wire jars) it wouldn't have that problem.
But, note the shape: you open the top and have access to *all* of its contents -- even any "little cookies" that aren't "tall enough" to extend up to the top of the container. So, you don't have to try to fish around for the cookie that you *want* (sometimes you want a big one, sometimes you want a small one) through a tiny opening.
Likewise, when the number of cookies falls to a smaller number and they can no longer "stand up" side by side, you can easily retrieve them "lying flat" on the bottom of the container.
It has been able to accommodate my "ever lengthening" biscotti baking style (recipe changes cause the cookies to get longer which means taller container required). And, it's big enough for 1.5 batches of cookies (ideally, it would be EXACTLY 1.0 batches in size to make it a bit smaller on the kitchen table -- but, we don't complain over the slightly larger width).
[I.e., this was a great container from a usability point of view. It's just not held up well from a *durability* point of view!]

Like this referenced on the same page? <http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/store/product/oggi-ez-grip-regular-coffee-canister/1016088455 I think too small -- esp considering the volume lost to the "hand-hold" that is molded into the side (?)
Our local Costco has some (overpriced) XMAS cookies that they are selling in a *ceramic* container of this sort (though it is square with round opening so not quite as accessible). The idea of buying a fancy jar of cookies and throwing away the cookies seems sort of silly. But, if the jar proves to be "acceptable", we may go that route. Though not having a clear body or lid is a drawback -- means you have to open it to see how many are left (and how many days before I will have to bake another batch!)
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Avoid ANY plastic. My late mother hadda buncha plastice wire-bale containers. Hadda toss 'em all cuz they permanently absorbed the flavor/aroma of the contents. Specially bad if the contents tend toward rancidity, like nut meats.

Buy a small one to try out, initially. I've found the Bormioli brand jars, from Amazon, have a major flaw. The rubber gasket absorbs ANY smell/flavor fer months. The gasket in my Bormioli coffee grounds jar smelled of coffee for 6 mos after I quit using it. I never had this problem with Luminarc jars, but that brand is becoming harder and harder to locate:
http://www.goodmans.net/d/1530/luminarc-canning-jars-accessories.htm
I usta have the 3L jar and I recall it was tall enough for dried spaghetti pasta. You may wanna check dimensions, first. ;)
nb
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On 11/12/2015 9:38 AM, notbob wrote:

In general, I dislike plastic primarily for freshness issues. Certain types of plastic block oxygen transport; others don't. E.g., when i wrap biscotti for shipping, I wrap them in "Saran" wrap (for moisture), *then* tinfoil. PITA but it beats shipping air-tight containers to people! :>
Odor isn't a problem with this as *all* it will be used for is biscotti and they don't have an appreciable scent.
OTOH, most of my (rubbermaid?) containers for marinara sauce are permanently stained red -- makes me wonder what my insides must look like! :-/

The problem is typically opening size. This is something that you use daily. And, don't "pour" out of. Most of those containers have small openings that top larger vessels -- i.e., have a "neck".
E.g., we have a buddy who brings us pickled vegetables and other "canned" items. Invariably, you have to use a fork to fish things out because you can't effectively navigate their contents with fingers.
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You need to learn howto use chopsticks. ;)
nb
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On 11/13/2015 12:15 PM, notbob wrote:

How do you think I ate today's lunch? :>
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On 11/13/2015 3:11 PM, Don Y wrote:

The only food I am any good at eating with chop sticks is sushi.
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On 11/13/2015 3:44 PM, Muggles wrote:

I eat with the tools appropriate for the meal in question. E.g., oriental dishes I use chopsticks; shrimp I use a shrimp fork; deep dish pizza a knife and fork; NY-style pizza my hands; etc. It just doesn't "feel right" using something else.
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On 11/13/2015 9:32 PM, Don Y wrote:

I'd use a spoon or fork for most everything, but sushi it just seems right to use chop sticks!
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